SHELiB CENTER

Research

The research at the SHELiB Center is focused on (1) the development of suitable solid electrolytes that can suppress dendrite growth in high energy density lithium batteries and (2) multi-electron transfer reactions in anode and cathode materials. Our laboratoThe research at the SHELiB Center is focused on (1) the development of suitable solid electrolytes that can suppress dendrite growth in high energy density lithium batteries and (2) multi-electron transfer reactions in anode and cathode materials. Our laboratory is currently concentrated on three types of electrolytes including a) high Li-ion conducting solid polymer electrolytes, b) ceramic electrolytes, and c) ceramic-polymer composite solid electrolytes. Our primary goal focuses on improving the interfaces between the lithium metal anode and solid electrolytes. We plan to control lithium reactions with the electrolyte by functionalizing the electrolyte surfaces. To create an intimate interfacial region, lithium metal thin films will be deposited by thermal evaporation.

We are also working to develop suitable solid electrolytes for high capacity cathodes such as lithium sulfide (Li2S) with the goal of developing all-solid-state high energy Lithium batteries.

Here is a brief description of ongoing projects.

  • Solid Polymer Electrolytes: Working on various polymer electrolytes systems (such as PEO, PMMA and other co-polymers etc.) with new lithium salts and additives to improve the electrochemical properties and to suppress dendrite growth.
  • Ceramic Electrolytes: Working on various oxide and sulfide based ceramic electrolytes, depositing by sputtering method such as LLZO (Li7La3Zr2O12) and, thio-LISICON lithium superionic conductor. Studies will focus on understanding interfacial properties lithium metal and the electrolytes and the performance of all solid-state devices.
  • Ceramic-Polymer Electrolytes: Developing ceramic-polymer electrolytes using newly optimized polymer electrolytes and various oxide and sulfide based Li-ion glass-ceramic solid electrolyte. Its electrochemical stability with lithium metal will be examined by using advanced characterization techniques.
  • Synthesis of sulfur-nanocarbon cathodes: We are also working on sulfur-nanocarbon (rGO and/or CNFs) cathodes. This cathodes will be tested with various solid electrolytes. Efforts will be made to overcome polysulfide dissolution issues using suitable solid electrolytes and optimized the electrochemical performance along with long cycling stability.

SHELiB Center - Department of Chemistry

Xavier University of Louisiana 1 Drexel Drive New Orleans, LA 70125

SHELiB@Xula.edu

Tel: (504) 520-7245

Fax: (504) 520-7215