UNIVERSITY CATALOG
 
 
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ACCOUNTING (ACCT)

1010 - 1020.Principles of Accounting I and II - Each usually offered fall and spring. Application of modern accounting principles of sole proprietorship, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: Completion of all required developmental courses. Courses must be taken in sequence. (3 - 3)

1030. Survey of Accounting – Familiarize students with the use of accounting data as a decision making tool. Accounting statements and ratios pertaining to analyses of situations which students will encounter in business will be used. This course is open to students working on a minor in Business Administration, Sales and Marketing or Entrepreneurship. (3)

2010 - 2020.Intermediate Accounting I and II - 2010 usually offered in fall; 2020 usually offered in spring. Nature and content of balance sheet accounts, principles of their determination. Interpretation of financial statements. Courses must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: ACCT 1020. (3 - 3)

2050. Managerial Accounting – Usuallyoffered in fall and spring. Managerial accounting provides information to managers who plan, direct and control the operations of a business. It provides the essential data with which businesses are actually run. This course will familiarize students with the use of this accounting data as a managerial decision making tool, as well as, accounting statements, budgets, and ratios pertaining to analyses of situations that students will encounter in the management of a business. Pre-requisite: ACCT 1020. (3)

3010.Advanced Accounting - Usually offered fall semester. Advanced phases of partnership and corporation accounting, consolidated balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and issues in international accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020. (3)

3030.Tax Accounting - Usually offered fall semester. Federal Income Tax provisions and procedures; problems of computing gross income, deductions, credits against net income, tax liability; preparation of tax returns; special taxes; commercial accounting practices and tax accounting provisions. . (3)

3040.Auditing - Usually offered spring semester. Accepted principles and practices of auditing that underlie balance sheets, detailed and continuous audits; auditor's certificate and audit reports; completion of practice and audit case. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020. (3)

3070.Elementary Cost Accounting - Usually offered fall semester. Accounting factors of manufacturing and distribution of cost, use of entries, books, records, reports in modern cost systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020. (3)

3080.Advanced Cost Accounting - Usually offered spring semester. Problems of cost control; estimation of cost systems; predetermined costs, flexible budgets, analysis and treatment of cost variances for managerial purposes. Prerequisite: 3070. (3)

3090.Governmental Accounting - Usually offered spring semester. Accounting principles and practices of governmental agencies and other not-for-profit organizations. Accounting for various governmental funds emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 2020. (3)

4000.Seminar - Usually offered spring semester. Selected topics in accounting. The use of personal computers in processing accounting data, management reports and financial decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 3010 and senior standing. (3)

4040. Advanced Tax Accounting - Federal Income Tax provisions and procedures relative to partnerships, decedents, estates, trusts, corporations; securities; pensions, foreign income, self-employment; estimated tax, audit; estate and gift taxes; tax research. (3)

4501, 4502, 4503.Directed Readings in Accounting - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Intensive individual readings in areas agreed upon by student, instructor, and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3 )

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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AEROSPACE STUDIES (AERO)

General Military Courses

1010/1010L-1020/1020L.Foundations of the United States Air Force I and II - Survey courses designed to introduce cadets to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. (1/0-1/0)

1210/1210L-1220/1220L.The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I and II - Examines the general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. The course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the 21 st century war on terrorism. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of air and space power. The course examines fundamentals associated with war in the third dimension: e.g., principles of war and tenets of air and space power. As a whole, this course provides cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the employment of air and space power, from a doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, students continue discussing the importance of the Air Force Core Values, through operational examples and historical Air Force leaders, and continue to develop their communications skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences. (1/0-1/0)

Professional Officer Courses

3010/3010L- 3020/3020L.Air Force Leadership Studies I and II - A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, ethics, and the communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory leadership laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course. (3/0 - 3/0)

4010/4010L- 4020/4020L.National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I and II - Examines the national security process, regional studies, ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory leadership laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of this course. (3/0 - 3/0)

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AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (AFAM)

2000.Introduction to African American History and Culture - This course is an introductory survey of the history and culture of African Americans and a further examination of their philosophical and intellectual traditions. In the course, students are introduced to the African origins of African Americans, an interdisciplinary examination of their sociocultural development in the American context, and an investigation of their contributions to the development of United States history and culture. (3)

2010.Introduction to African American Social Sciences - This course will introduce students to a general conceptual framework for ordering the social/behavioral theories and methods that people of African descent have used to interpret and understand African American life experiences. In the course, students will be introduced to an interdisciplinary examination of areas of critical inquiry pertaining to the diversity and complexity of the African American experience as it relates to the social sciences. Particular emphasis will be placed on how variables associated with academic areas such as anthropology, communications, political economy, psychology, sociology, and popular culture interact with and impact African Americans. (3)

2020.Special Topics in African American Studies - This course is designed to more fully develop topics, genres, periods, and texts that are touched upon in the Introduction to African American History course (AFAM 2000). The course is taught from an interdisciplinary perspective that emphasizes methodologies and approaches from both the humanities and the social sciences. The course may be taken up to three times as long as the content differs in the three Topics courses selected by an individual student. (3)

2030.(SOCI 2030) Survey of Africa - Usually offered spring semester. Interdisciplinary course dealing with traditional (pre-European), colonial, and post-independence African political, social, and economic structures and institutions. Course also focuses on problems of social, political, and economic development facing contemporary African nations. (3)

2060.(SOCI 2060)Race and Ethnic Relations - Issues, problems, and research findings of race, ethnic, and minority group relations. Race differences; patterns of racial and ethnic migration; patterns of race and ethnic conflict; stages in racial and ethnic group contact; the distributive, social, psychological, and organizational dimensions of inequality; various types of resolutions to racial and ethnic group contact. Emphasis is on American black-white relations, American ethnic groups, religious conflict, and racial and ethnic group contacts in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (3)

3025.(SOCI 3025) 20 th Century African American Urban Life - This interdisciplinary course examines African Americans as agents in shaping the 20 th century urban experience in the United States. The central focus of the course will be the development of cultural, social, religious, economic, educational and political institutions. Examples will be drawn from among communities such as Harlem, NY, the Central Avenue district of Los Angeles, Chicago’s south side, and the Auburn Avenue district of Atlanta as well as others. Prerequisite: AFAM 2000. (3)

3040.African American Inquiry - This course introduces students to ways in which scholars examine the African American experience. The theory component of the course is designed to introduce students to an interdisciplinary approach to framing inquiries about African American life, history, and sociocultural organization. The methods component of this course will examine various analytical and philosophical approaches central to study and research applicable to African American studies. Prerequisite: AFAM 2000. (3)

3050.(HIST 3050)Gandhi and King: Nonviolent Philosophy of Conflict Resolution - This course examines the similarities and differences between Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. -- their leadership styles, personality traits, philosophical assumptions, the movements they led, and their tactics in particular campaigns. (3)

3085.(SOCI 3085) Sociology of the African American Experience - Through the application of sociological concepts, theory, and methods, this course will focus on the socio-historical experience of African Americans as the social institutions in US society. Included will be a critical examination of the African Diaspora. Prerequisites: SOCI 2060 and AFAM 2000. (3)

3290.(ENGL 3290)20th Century Survey of African American Writers - A study of major African American texts of the twentieth century, from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary period. (3)

3350.(HIST 3350)African American History I - Chronological and in-depth study of specific issues affecting African Americans from their West African beginnings to Civil War. Major themes to be announced each semester. (3)

3360.(HIST 3360)African American History II - Continuation of topical survey of main currents in African American life from the Civil War to the present. Major themes to be announced each semester. (3)

3370.African Americans, Africa, and Pan Africanism - This course presents an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Pan Africanism as a multidimensional, realistic, authentic, and effective mechanism by which people of African descent in the United States have related historically and culturally to the African dimension of their identity. The course will employ methods germane to the disciplines of history, sociology, political science, and anthropology. Factual information and theoretical analyses relative to the establishment and development of a consciousness among African Americans of an African past will be presented and discussed. The course will address also the implications of African Americans identification with Africa on the process of globalization and the formation of the African Diaspora. (3)

3375.(ENGL 3175) Survey of African Literature - Introduction to African folklore, poetry, fiction, and drama. (3)

4000.Seminar in African American Studies - Research and writing intensive seminar, exploring the critical issues and texts which define the interdisciplinary nature of African American Studies. Research is required that synthesizes knowledge gained from the concentration in African American Studies. It is recommended that students complete all core requirements in the African American Studies minor before enrolling in this course. (3)

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AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (AMSL)

1010-1020.American Sign Language I and II - Introductory course designed to develop basic receptive and expressive language skills. Emphasis will be on natural language production and appropriate cultural interaction. Students will learn basic languages, structures, acquire a working vocabulary and knowledge of sentences, phrases, and appropriate non-manual behaviors. Instruction in AMSL without the use of voice. (3-3)

 

ART (ART)

ART COURSES DESIGNATED WITH AN * ARE STUDIO, HANDS-ON COURSES

1010*. Design Ia - Foundation course in the study of the elements and principles of design using primarily a two-dimensional format. Students will be introduced to the basic design elements as well as the design principles and their use in visual language. (3)

1020*.Design Ib - Foundation course in the study of the elements and principles of design using a three dimensional format. This course serves as an introduction to the study of three-dimensional form. Students will gain a working knowledge of structural patterns of form, linear and planar analysis of form, analysis of implied form, and of manipulative devices applied to form. Prerequisite: ART 1010. (3)

1030*. Drawing Ia - A development of the fundamentals, concepts and skills of drawing through a broad range of aesthetic expressions, working both inside and outside traditional thought, to translate three-dimensional objects into two-dimensional form through observational studies. Students will work in multiple black and white wet and dry media. (3)

1040*.Drawing Ib - Continuation of Art 1030 exploring color and varieties of color and mixed media techniques and continues the use of drawing to explore the visual language. Prerequisite: ART 1030. (3)

1050*.Introduction to Ceramics - Combining theory and practice, an in-depth investigation of ceramic art, including hand-building techniques, with an introduction to the potter's wheel. Clay and glaze mixing, and various kiln-firing procedures are also explored, along with a historical overview. (3)

1060*.Introduction to Painting - An introduction to fundamental, formal and technical problems of painting concepts and skills (development) both traditional and experimental, in various opaque media. (3)

1090.Art Appreciation - An introduction to visual art, where study of visual elements and principles are examined through stylistic developments in the history of art from ancient to the present, with attention to media and world civilizations. (3)

2011*.Introduction to Black and White Photography - An introductory class to the traditional style of photography using a manual SLR camera with black and white film, process film, use chemicals, and develop prints as an art form. (3)

2020*.(SMKT 2020)Introduction to Graphic and Advertising Design - An introduction to visual communication graphics and design with an emphasis on printed materials. Illustrative graphics, symbol/logo design, typography, layout principles systems, camera-ready art and the use of computer technology are part of this course. (3)

2030*.Drawing IIa - The study through drawing of formal and expressive potentials of human anatomy. Primary focus is on compositional structures of the human skeleton and human figure. Prerequisite: ART 1040. (3)

2040*.Drawing IIb - Exploration of formal and expressive potentials of the human figure; traditional and experimental techniques. Various media and expressive techniques. Prerequisite: ART 2030. (3)

2070*.Introduction to Sculpture - Introduction to basic sculptural processes and materials through construction, modeling, mold making, and metal casting. (3)

2080*.Introduction to Printmaking - An introduction to multiple image making through relief, intaglio, planographic, and stencil processes. (3)

2090.Art Essentials for Teachers - Art education for elementary education majors; theory, practice; experience with materials, techniques. (3)

2110.History of Art Ia - A survey of art and architecture from its prehistoric beginnings through the Middle Ages. (3)

2120.History of Art Ib - A survey of western art and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. (3)

2130-2140.Contemporary Art History - Lectures, discussions (on art) and study of European and American art and architecture from about 1900 to the present, including developments since impressionism. Studies include gallery visits, reading, related activities. Prerequisite: ART 2130 is a prerequisite for ART 2140. (3-3)

2600. Developing Community Programs through the Arts - The intern seminar is intended to cultivate basic competencies in areas relevant to effective community organization and program development. Through active participation, students will become efficient resources to the Community Arts Partnership Initiative and to the community at large. Students will develop through the seminar a vocabulary for problem solving within the community context in the arts. Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore, junior, or senior status. (3)

3000.Trends in Art Education - An intensive study of the major issues in art education with an emphasis on the literature since 1950. (3)

3011*.Advanced Black and White Photography - This class will build on the techniques studied in the introductory class using traditional techniques with a manual SLR camera. Prerequisite: ART 2011. (3)

3022*.Digital Color Photography - This class will focus on using the computer as a tool in the creation of color prints. Students will be required to use either a standard color film camera or a high-resolution digital camera. The emphasis will be the idea of color, the usage and power in color in making an image. (3)

3030*-3040*.Drawing III a-b - Continuation of Drawing II in the advanced study of drawing. Prerequisite: ART 2040 is a prerequisite for ART 3030 and ART 3030 for ART 3040. (3-3)

3050*-3060*.Painting II a-b - Advanced studies using painting mediums and appropriate experimentation with different supports and techniques. Students are expected to establish an integrated personal vision at a level qualitatively beyond previous involvement in beginning painting. Prerequisite: ART 1060 is a prerequisite for ART 3050 and ART 3050 for ART 3060. (3-3)

3070*-3080*.Sculpture II a-b - Advanced studies in understanding sculptural form. Advanced development of skills; in modeling, casting, other techniques; emphasis on figure. Students are expected to establish an integrated personal vision at a level qualitatively beyond previous involvement. Prerequisite: ART 2070 is a prerequisite for ART 3070 and ART 3070 for ART 3080. (3-3)

3090*-3100*.Printmaking II a-b - Continued investigation of print media. Students are expected to initiate individual direction for their work with particular emphasis on serially developing their ideas. Students are encouraged to utilize mixed print media as well as other media – experimentation is stressed. Prerequisite: ART 2080 is a prerequisite for ART 3090 and ART 3090 for ART 3100. (3-3)

3110*-3120*.Ceramics II a-b - Creative exploration in pottery; making clay bodies, glazes; wheel-throwing, varied procedures in hand building. Emphasis is on the union of aesthetics and good craftsmanship. Involvement in all areas of studio operations is required. Prerequisite: ART 1050 is a prerequisite for ART 3110 and ART 3110 for ART 3120. (3-3)

3150*.Creative Crafts - Art quality including creative use of various materials such as fiber, metal, leather, wood, etc. (3)

3170*.Calligraphy - Knowledge, skills in letter structure, work and word-group design, calligraphic and built-up letter forms. (3)

3200.Art Trends and Policy - This course will use lectures, discussions, visits and directed readings from texts and articles. This course is designed to bring students up to date information on current artists, theories, practices and policies. Prerequisite: ART 1090. (3)

4010*-4020*.Graphic and Advertising Design II a-b - From roughs to finished work for reproduction. Critically solve practical design problems while expanding electronic techniques emphasizing production methods. Basic web page design and production are explored. Prerequisite: ART 2020 is a prerequisite for ART 4010 and ART 4010 for ART 4020. (3-3)

4030*-4040*.Drawing IV a-b - Advanced work from human figure; various creative approaches in many media. Prerequisite: ART 3030 is a prerequisite for ART 4030 and ART 4030 for ART 4040. (3-3)

4050*-4060*.Painting III a-b - Continuation of painting II. Advancement in visual consciousness, technical skills as means to significant work. Prerequisite: ART 3060 is a prerequisite for ART 4050 and ART 4050 for ART 4060. (3-3)

4070*-4080*.Sculpture III a-b - Continuation of ART 3070-3080. Carving, modeling, casting construction; welding, brazing soldering, etc. Prerequisite: ART 3070 is a prerequisite for ART 4070 and ART 4070 for ART 4080. (3-3)

4090*-4100*.Printmaking III a-b - Experimental prints, various methods/ processes; advanced lithography, etching, serigraphy, woodcut, calligraphy. Prerequisite: ART 3090 is a prerequisite for ART 4090 and ART 4090 for ART 4100. (3-3)

4110*-4120*.Ceramics III a-b - Continuation of ART 3110-3120; development of skills in pottery making; creative design, exploration of techniques. Prerequisite: ART 3110 is a prerequisite for ART 4110 and ART 4110 for ART 4120. (3-3)

4130.African Art - This course is a survey if the major cultures and objects as art form of Sub Saharan Africa. Traditional material and conceptual African development will be discussed through examination of art objects. (3)

4140.Art of the African Diaspora - This course is a discussion of the trends and stylistic changes in the art of African descended peoples around the world after slavery. (3)

4150*-4160*.Painting IV a-b - Continuation of ART 4050-4060. Prerequisite: ART 3090 is a prerequisite for ART 4090 and ART 4090 for ART 4100. (3-3)

4170*-4180*.Sculpture IV a-b - Continuation of ART 4070-4080. Prerequisite: ART 4080 is a prerequisite for ART 4170 and ART 4170 for ART 4180. (3-3)

4190*-4200*.Printmaking IV a-b - Continuation of ART 4090-4100. Prerequisite: ART 4090 is a prerequisite for ART 4190 and ART 4190 for ART 4200. (3-3)

4210*-4220*.Graphic and Advertising Design III a-b - Continuation of ART 4010-4020. Prerequisite: ART 4020 is a prerequisite for ART 4210 and ART 4210 for ART 4220. (3-3)

4310*-4320*.Ceramics IV a-b - Continuation of ART 4110-4120. Prerequisite: ART 4110 is a prerequisite for ART 4310 and ART 4310 for ART 4320. (3-3)

4410*-4420*.Graphics and Advertising Design IV a-b - Continuation of ART 4210-4220. Prerequisite: ART 4210 is a prerequisite for ART 4410 and ART 4410 for ART 4420. (3-3)

4501, 4502, 4503. Directed Readings in Art - Students work under the direction of faculty members to fulfill their needs and interests. (1, 2, 3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (BHSC)

2511.(PSYC 2511)Analytic Research I - Usually offered fall and spring semester. A calculational survey of introductory statistics. Examines both descriptive and inferential statistical processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 and completion of all developmental mathematics requirements. (3)

3010.(PSYC 3010)Social Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. Survey of social influences on behavior. Includes affiliation and interpersonal attraction; person perception; conformity; attitude formation, assessment, and change; prejudice; aggression; social learning; and group dynamics. Prerequisites: PSYC 1010, PSYC 2020, and PSYC 2512, or permission of the instructor. (3)

3370.(PADM 3370UV)Administrative Behavior - Usually offered spring semester. Concepts of administrative behavior in public organizations, including decision-making, leadership, small group behavior, and analysis of such organizations as social systems. (3)

3510.Analytic Research II - Usually offered spring semester. Focus on use of factorial ANOVA and multiple regression as well as non-parametric and contingency-table techniques for analysis. Intermediate issues in research design are covered, with intermediate SPSS programming and beginning BMDP programming. Each student will design a significant research project. Prerequisite: BHSC 2511. (3)

4510.Analytic Research III - Usually offered fall semester. Intended for students specializing in research or aspiring to graduate studies. Advanced statistical techniques as well as advanced issues in research applications and statistical programming. Students will complete a significant research project. (3)

4800.(PSCI 4800)Advanced Research in the Behavioral Sciences - Intended for students preparing for a research-oriented career or planning on pursuing graduate study in their discipline. Focus on quantitative analysis of data using mainframe computers and SPSS and the presentation of reports and hypothesis testing. Students will complete a significant research project within a general topic area and using a large data set selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: BHSC 2511 (PSYC 2511) and either PSYC 2512 or PSCI 2010, or consent of instructor. (3)

4830.(PCLN 4830, PHAD 4830)Drug and Substance Abuse Education - Usually offered spring semester. The terminology of drug use and abuse; the physiological, psychological, sociological, and legal implications of drug abuse; techniques of providing innovative education in drug and substance abuse. Student participation and group interaction. (3)

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BIOLOGY (BIOL)

1030/1030L - 1040/1040L.General Biology - Modern concepts in biology for the non-science major. Lecture and laboratory should be taken concurrently. NOT APPLICABLE TO MAJOR OR MINOR IN BIOLOGY. (2/1 - 2/1)

1050.Environmental Biology - The biological and social implications of the relationship between the environment and human society. NOT APPLICABLE AS A BIOLOGY ELECTIVE FOR STUDENTS MAJORING OR MINORING IN BIOLOGY. (3)

1230/1230L - 1240/1240L.General Biology - Science Majors. Basic biological principles and concepts as they apply to all levels of organization. BIOL 1230 is a prerequisite for 1240. (3/1 - 3/1)

BIOL 1240 IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL HIGHER-NUMBERED COURSES IN BIOLOGY.

2000/2000L.Biodiversity - Survey of biological diversity, basic principles and concepts of biological systematics, taxonomy, evolutionary theory, and ecology. (3/1)

2010/2010L. General Microbiology - Study of microorganisms. Laboratory emphasizes principles of bacteriological technique, microscopic study, and environmental influences affecting microorganisms. (3/1)

2340.(SPTH 2340)Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism - Identification and function of structures pertinent to the processes of speech and hearing. FOR SPEECH PATHOLOGY MAJORS AND MINORS ONLY. (3)

2400.(EDEL 2400)Nutrition - Basic concepts of human nutrition, including importance of food to the body; the nature and composition of foods; release and utilization of nutrients; planning the daily diet and the process of digestion and absorption. FOR EDUCATION MAJORS ONLY. (3)

3070/3070L.Immunology - Basic concepts of immunol­ogy and immunological disorders. Laboratory includes discussions and application of the basic principles of serology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or permission of instructor. (3/1)

3081/3081L.Medical Microbiology - Study of various human pathogens, with emphasis on basic biology and the host-pathogen interaction. Laboratory consists of selected exercises relevant to the culture and manipulation of bacterial pathogens and other microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010/2010L and CHEM 2210 or permission of instructor. (3/1)

3091/3091L.Cell Biology - Molecular basis of eucaryotic cell structure and function. Laboratory introduces techniques used in the study of cells. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/1020L. (3/1)

3110/3110L.Genetics - Fundamental principles of classical and molecular genetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/1020L. (3/1)

3141/3141L.General Zoology - Structure and function of vertebrate and invertebrate animals in an evolutionary context. (3/1)

3151/3151L.General Botany - Basic principles of the biology of plants. (3/1)

3150.Virology - General properties of viruses, their isolation and chemical composition. Special emphasis placed on molecular biology of bacterial and animal viruses. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or permission of instructor. (3)

3162/3162L.Introduction to Embryology - Analytical approach to major aspects of development. Laboratory stresses morphological development of selected vertebrates. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/1021L. LECTURE AND LABORATORY MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY. (4/0)

3210/3210L.Ecology - The relationship between organisms and their environment. (3/1)

3350/3350L.Anatomy and Physiology - Basic structural and functional aspects of the human body. Laboratory includes histological and macroscopic anatomy together with exercises emphasizing the functional aspects of the systems. NOT OPEN TO PHARMACY STUDENTS. (3/1)

3360/3360L.Parasitology - Key aspects of the biology of parasitic animals. Special emphasis placed on those parasites of medical importance. Laboratory stresses microscopic study of parasites. (3/1)

3450/3450L-3460. (PHCL 3450/3450L-3460) Human Physiology and Anatomy - Comprehensive view of the human body emphasizing individual systems and their interactions with each other and exogenous materials. LIMITED TO PHARMACY STUDENTS. (3/1-3)

4011S-4020S.Honors Seminar - Presentation and discussion of current biological problems and research interests as presented by faculty, students, and guest speakers. Takes the place of the BIOL 4210 requirement for seniors in the honors program. Prerequisite: 20 hours in biology and admission to the "Honors in Biology" Program. Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 4011S. (0/1)

4050/4050L.Animal Physiology - Coordinated functional relationships of different taxa of animals with respect to adaptation to varied habitats and changing environment. (3/1)

4091/4091L.Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy - Evolutionary approach to the study of structural and functional relationships between several vertebrate taxa. Laboratory work requires extensive dissection. LECTURE AND LABORATORY MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY. (4/0)

4111/4111L.Histology - Structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ systems. Laboratory stresses microscopic study of cells and tissues. LECTURE AND LABORATORY MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/1020L. (4/0)

4210.Introduction to Scientific Literature - Types of biological articles are discussed and reviewed. Students will give both oral and written critiques and summaries of assigned articles. Required of and limited to biology seniors. Pre-requisite: Completion of all required biology courses. (1)

4220.Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Study of microorganisms as related to food, water, agricultural, and industrial processes. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/2010L. (3)

4240.Microbial Physiology - Structure-function relationships in the microbial world, with emphasis on the biochemistry and metabolism of bacteria and selected other forms. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010, CHEM 2210 or permission of instructor (3)

4250/4250L.Molecular Genetics - Molecular biology of the gene. Special emphasis placed on comparison of gene expression in procaryotes and eucaryotes. Prerequisites: BIOL 2010/2010L and CHEM 2210/2230L. (3/1)

4300, 4301, 4302, 4303.Advanced Topics in Biology - Designed to permit a student to pursue an in-depth treatment of a topic. Specific topics are announced when the course is offered. Prerequisites: 16 hours of biology AND permission of instructor. (1, 2, or 3)

4320.Organic Evolution - Modern synthetic theory of evolution with emphasis on the mechanisms involved in this process. Strongly recommended: BIOL 3110/3110L

4350.Epidemiology - Study of the distribution and determinants of diseases and injuries in human populations. Prerequisite: Completion of all required Biology courses in the major or permission of the instructor. The course includes lectures, class discussion, independent module work, and assigned readings and projects. (3)

4402L.Techniques of Research in Biology - Theory and practice of various modern biological research techniques. Modular, team taught. Prerequisite: Junior standing in biology. May be repeated once for credit. (2)

4450.Introduction to Mammalian Tissue Culture - Theory and techniques of mammalian tissue culture with an emphasis on application in basic and clinical research. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and 2010L and junior or senior standing. In addition, instructor’s approval is needed since enrollment is restricted. (3)

4520.Undergraduate Research - Research participation for biology majors who have an established research project with a biology faculty member. Students whose research is mandated by a scholarship program are not permitted to register for this course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing in Biology and permission of the biology department chair. (2)

4550.Advanced Readings in Biology - This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the literature of the biological sciences at an advanced level. Specific topics and reading selections will vary from year to year. Primarily intended for biology education majors. Offered as needed, as a Directed Readings course. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Biology and 24 semester hours of biology. (3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

Courses offered through the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory

Not all courses listed are offered each year. Interested students should consult the GCRL Summer Announcement for courses offered each summer.

  • MAR - 300Marine Science I: Oceanography
  • MAR - 300LMarine Science I: Oceanography Lab
  • MAR - 301Marine Science II: Marine Biology
  • MAR - 301LMarine Science II: Marine Biology Lab
  • MAR - 403Marine Invertebrate Zoology
  • MAR - 403LMarine Invertebrate Zoology Lab
  • MAR - 404Parasites of Marine Animals
  • MAR - 404LParasites of Marine Animals Lab
  • MAR - 405Marine Ecology
  • MAR - 405Marine Ecology Lab
  • MAR - 406Fauna/Faunistic Ecology Tidal Marshes
  • MAR - 406LFauna/Faunistic Ecology Tidal Marshes Lab
  • MAR - 407Marine Aquaculture
  • MAR - 407LMarine Aquaculture Lab
  • MAR - 408Marine Ichthyology
  • MAR - 408LMarine Ichthyology Lab
  • MAR - 409Marine Microbiology
  • MAR - 409LMarine Microbiology Lab
  • MAR - 410Marine Fisheries Management
  • MAR - 410LMarine Fisheries Management Lab
  • MAR - 420Marine Phycology
  • MAR - 420LMarine Phycology Lab
  • MAR - 421Coastal Vegetation
  • MAR - 421LCoastal Vegetation Lab
  • MAR - 422Salt Marsh Plant Ecology
  • MAR - 422LSalt Marsh Plant Ecology Lab
  • MAR - 430Compar. Histology of Marine Organisms
  • MAR - 430LCompar. Histology of Marine Organisms Lab
  • MAR - 456Marine Science for Teachers I
  • MAR - 456LMarine Science for Teachers I Lab
  • MAR - 457Marine Science for Teachers II
  • MAR - 457LMarine Science for Teachers II Lab
  • MAR - 458Marine Science for Elementary Teachers
  • MAR - 458LMarine Science for Elementary Teachers Lab
  • MAR - 482Coastal Marine Geology
  • MAR - 482LCoastal Marine Geology Lab
  • MAR - 490Special Problems in Marine Science
  • MAR - 491Special Topics in Marine Science

Courses offered through the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), Cocodrie, Louisiana

Not all courses listed are offered each year. Interested students should consult the Consortium’s Summer Announcement, available through the faculty liaison, for further information.

  • Introduction to Marine Science
  • Introduction to Marine Zoology
  • Topics in Marine Science
  • Special Problems in Marine Science
  • Coastal Marine Geology
  • Marine Ecology
  • Marine Invertebrate Zoology
  • Marine Science for Teachers
  • Marine Vertebrate Zoology

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BSAD)

1010.*Introduction to Business - Usually offered fall semester. Fundamentals of Business Administration; underlying principles of management, and structures and functions of its various departments. (3)

* Open to business majors as a first business course only. Business minors cannot use course as a Business Elective.

2011.Organizational Communications - Usually offered fall semester. Concepts and applications of communication in business settings. Reading, writing, speaking, listening, and use of technology. Team decision-making, ethics, critical thinking, cross-cultural issues. Prerequisites: ENGL 1020. (3)

3030.Business Law - Usually offered spring semester. Commercial law as it affects accountancy - CPA law. (3)

3035.**Legal Aspects of Business - Usually offered fall semester. A study of the basic legal concepts and procedures as well as basic principles pertaining to fundamental business transactions. (3

** Not open to Accounting majors.

3055.Quantitative Analysis - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introduction to the concepts of various quantitative methods such as Decision Analysis, Forecasting, Linear Programming, Inventory Management, and Project Scheduling and their role in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: ECON 2070. (3)

3195.Computer-Based Information Systems - Usually offered spring semester. Provides students with an understanding of applications of the computer to the support of managerial decision-making processes. Topics include basic business information concepts, the organization of information systems, recently developed computer-supported managerial techniques and problems accompanying advances in computer technology. Prerequisites: MGT 2060. (3)

3200. International Business - Usually offered spring semester. Addresses the major activities involved in international business. Emphasis is placed upon marketing, finance, economics, management, accounting, taxation, culture, and politics as they apply to international business. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050, MGT 2060 or permission of chairperson or advisor. (3)

3900-3905.Business Administration Summer Internship - Usually offered summer semester. Ten to twelve weeks of work experience in business, industry, or government related to the student's academic program. Completion of two internship reports. Graded on Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisites: business department major, completion of 62 degree credit hours and 2.0 or above grade point average, or permission of department chairman. (3,3)

4000.Business Policy - Usually offered spring semester. The capstone course that integrates the material learned in the foundation courses of finance, accounting, marketing and management into paradigms for strategic decision makers in domestic and foreign business entities. In addition, innovative strategic tools in contemporary business will be applied to case studies and a comprehensive term project. Senior standing or a written waiver from the department chair is mandatory for this course. Prerequisites: MGT 2060, SMKT 2050 and FINC 3050. (3)

4501, 4502, 4503.Directed Readings in Business Administration - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Intensive individual readings in areas agreed upon by student, instructor, and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3 )

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

1010/1010D.-1020/1020D.General Chemistry I-II - Atomic structure, bonding, chemical stoichiometry and calculations, states of matter, thermochemistry, kinetics, electrochemistry, and equilibrium. 1010 and 1020 have three lectures per week. 1010D and 1020D are drill sessions meeting once per week. Prerequisites: Completion of all developmental Mathematics requirements. CHEM 1010/1010D are prerequisites for CHEM 1020/1020D. Corequisites: CHEM 1010 and 1010D; CHEM 1020 and 1020D. (3/0 - 3/0)

1011L.General Chemistry I Laboratory - Students are introduced to explorations of chemical and/or physical systems by discovering concepts rather than verifying them. Students who complete this course will be able to identify pertinent variables, recognize qualitative trends in data, determine quantitative relationships and test the validity of conclusions on a particular chemical or physical system. 1011L is a one session per week 3-hour laboratory. Corequisites: CHEM 1010/1010D. (1)

1021L.General Chemistry II Laboratory - Students are introduced to a series of experiments in which schemes for separation and identification of mixtures of inorganic cations are utilized. Students will also conduct experiments introducing them to a variety of techniques in acid-base titrations, electrochemistry, and kinetic studies. Students who complete this course will be familiar with the techniques and principles of qualitative inorganic analysis. In addition, Students will develop basic laboratory skills necessary for upper-level courses and for research. 1021L is a one session per week 3-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010/1010D/1011L. Corequisites: CHEM 1020/1020D. (1)

1500.Survey of Environmental Chemistry - This course is a survey of the nature, reactions and transport of chemicals present in the environment. Basic chemical principles and laboratory skills will be introduced as students study: Energy and Resources in the Environment, Toxic Substances, Energy Production, Water Quality, Atmospheric Chemistry, Soil Chemistry, Restoration and Waste Management. Recommended for non-science majors. Prerequisites: None. (3)

2210/2210D - 2220/2220D.Organic Chemistry I-II - Introduction to the structural theories, physical and chemical behavior, synthesis, reaction mechanisms, and identification of compounds composed primarily of carbon and hydrogen. Students who complete the course will become familiar with the large body of information required before the chemistry of living systems (biochemistry and molecular biology) can be studied. The critical thinking skills needed to apply this information to a wide variety of problems, both professional and societal, are strongly developed. 2210D and 2220D are drill sessions meeting once per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1020/1020D/1021L are prerequisite to 2210/2210D; 2210/2210D are prerequisite to 2220/2220D. (3/0 - 3/0)

2230L - 2240L.Organic Chemistry Laboratory I-II - Students are introduced to microscale and macroscale organic laboratory techniques, selected instrumental analysis, and chemical safety. Students learn to critically assess their data and observations, and to prepare organized, scientific reports from their findings. In the second semester, these techniques are applied to experiments which correlate with material presented in the lecture. Students get hands-on experience with organic reactions, syntheses, instrumental analyses, and interpretations as well as presentation of results. Prerequisites: CHEM 1011L for 2230L; CHEM 2230L for 2240L. Corequisites: CHEM 2210/2210D for 2230L; CHEM 2220/2020D for 2040L. (1 - 1)

3010.Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences - Principles of physical chemistry as applied to biological and biomedical systems. Students who complete this course will gain an understanding of the physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases, the laws of thermodynamics, the properties of solutions, principles of chemical equilibria and chemical kinetics, quantum mechanical treatment of atoms and molecules, and the theory and applications of spectroscopy. The course will develop the critical thinking and computational skills of the students. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 1070, and PHYS 2020/2020L. (3)

3030.Physical Chemistry I - A survey of the principles of physical chemistry including thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Students who complete this course will gain an in-depth understanding of the principles governing the interaction of matter and energy, and will develop their critical thinking and computational skills. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 2070, and PHYS 2020/2020L. (3)

3030L.Physical Chemistry Laboratory I - A selection of experiments featuring the applications of the principles of physical chemistry. Experiments include the use of physical chemistry techniques to examine the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, reaction kinetics, and systems at equilibrium. The course requires extensive computational and writing skills. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. Corequisites: CHEM 3010 or 3030. (1)

3040.Physical Chemistry II - Advanced topics in atomic and molecular quantum theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, and photochemistry. Students who complete this course will gain an understanding of the properties of atoms and molecules, and the principles of the different types of spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L, MATH 2070, and PHYS 2020/2020L. (3)

3040L.Physical Chemistry Laboratory II - A selection of experiments featuring the applications of the principles of physical chemistry. Experiments include the use of physical chemistry techniques to examine the properties of solids, liquids, and gases, and various spectroscopic techniques to characterize substances. The course requires extensive computational and writing skills. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3210/3210L and CHEM 3010 or 3030. (1)

3210/3210L.Quantitative Analysis - Theory and techniques of chemical analysis including evaluation of data, gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric methods. 3210L is a one session four-hour laboratory which must be taken along with 3210. Prerequisites: CHEM 1020/1020D/1021L.(3/1)

3220L.Molecular Structure and Organic Synthesis Laboratory - Students perform multi-step synthesis and identify unknown and synthesized compounds. A variety of chemical and spectroscopic characterization methods are used. This course seeks to bridge the gap between the elementary organic lab and the advanced organic research lab. It allows students to develop critical reasoning skills, computational skills and oral and written presentation skills necessary for a professional career in science. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L. (2)

3450.Toxicology - A study of the fundamental principles of toxicology with emphasis on the chemical reactions and mechanisms involved. Topics include entry and fate of toxicants in the body, metabolism, toxic effects, and quantitation. A student completing this course will have a better understanding of the adverse effects of chemicals and other agents to human beings. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D, BIOL 1240. (3)

4010.Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 1 - A study of the theories and principles of bonding and structure as well as the descriptive chemistry and applications of the elements and their simple compounds. A student completing this course will be familiar with the information needed to connect the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry with the new technological applications of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 3030 or CHEM 3010. (3)

4011.Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2 - A study of the theories and principles of coordination chemistry, solution chemistry, and applications of organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. A student completing this course will be familiar with the information needed to relate coordination compounds and their reactions to the expanding applied fields of organometallics, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 4010. (3)

4073.Chemistry Literature Research - Students participate in an independent literature research project under the close supervision of a faculty advisor. This entails familiarization with relevant chemical literature, literature search, preparation of an abstract and a written report, and presentation of a departmental seminar. Students who complete this course learn to search and critically review the literature, evaluate their findings, prepare a formal and detailed research report, and present a seminar for constructive review by their peers and the faculty. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L. (3)

4080.Introduction to Research - Students are paired with research mentors who prepare them for research through a literature search and studies as well as research training. Students are also required to attend seminars offered at the scheduled class period weekly. These seminars will include lectures on such topics as chemical safety and research ethics. Students are required to present a literature seminar or a research prospectus during the semester. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L. (0)

4083.Undergraduate Research - Students participate in an independent and original laboratory research project under the close supervision of a faculty advisor. This entails familiarization with relevant chemical literature, laboratory work, preparation of an abstract and written report, and presentation of a departmental seminar. Students who complete this course learn to search and critically review the literature, develop specialized laboratory skills, evaluate their data, prepare a formal and detailed research report, and present a seminar for constructive review by their peers and the faculty. Students desiring credit for research performed off campus must obtain approval of their project from the course coordinator, register for this course, and present the required written and oral reports and a letter of evaluation from the off-campus supervisor of the research. Prerequisites: CHEM 4080 or permission of the course coordinator. (3)

4093.Undergraduate Environmental Research - Students participate in an independent and original research project in the area of environmental chemistry, under the close supervision of a faculty advisor. This entails familiarization with relevant chemical literature, laboratory and/or field work, preparation of an abstract and a written report, and presentation of a departmental seminar. Student who complete the course learn to search and critically review the literature, develop specialized laboratory skills, evaluate their data, prepare a formal and detailed written research report, and present a seminar for constructive review by their peers and the faculty. Students desiring credit for environmental research performed off campus must obtain approval of their project from the course coordinator, register for the course, and present the required written and oral reports and a letter of evaluation from the off-campus supervisor of the research. Prerequisites: CHEM 4080. (3)

4120.(PHSC 4120)Pharmaceutical Biochemistry - Students will be introduces to the structure and function of biomolecules, including their metabolism, synthesis, and degradation. They will learn major biochemical pathways and biochemical energetics. Students who complete the course will be aware of the significance of biochemistry relative to specific clinical problems. They will be cognizant of diseases derived from aberrant biochemical processes and of biochemical solutions based upon an understanding of molecular cellular processes. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220 or equivalent. Limited to Pharmacy students. (3)

4130.(PHSC 4130)Introduction to Biochemistry - The student’s understanding of cellular structure and composition on the molecular level will be developed through a study of the physical and chemical properties of the biomolecules of cells. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L. (3)

4130L.Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory - A selection of experiments covering the isolation of biochemical substances and the study of their properties. This course will enable the student to readily perform isolations of a number of types of biochemical substances, and to determine their properties and concentrations while gaining some skills in the use of common laboratory techniques and instruments. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L. (1)

4140.Metabolism - A study of biochemical energetics and the many biochemical pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and nucleic acid metabolism. The student will gain insight into the metabolism of biochemical substances on the molecular level, and insight into the universal and integrated nature of metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 4130. (3)

4150/4150L.Genomics and Proteomics - This course is designed to introduce students to the laboratory and computational methodologies used in analyzing DNA and proteins. It will employ molecular biology, chemistry, and bioinformatic techniques developed during the large-scale genome sequencing of multiple species including homo sapiens. A student completing this course will have better insight into the theoretical and practical aspects of understanding structure and function of DNA and proteins. CHEM 4150 and 4150L must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 4130/4130L and CHEM 3010 (or 3030). (2/1)

4151, 4152, 4153.Special Topics - Detailed discussion of one or more topics in chemistry. (1, 2, 3)

4160/4160L.Enzymology - A study of enzymes covering topics ranging from their isolation and purification from living organisms to their function and uses. The course will focus on complex kinetic studies and a study of the mechanism of action of complex enzymes. CHEM 4160 and 4160L must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 4130/4130L and CHEM 3010 (or 3030). (2/1)

4210.Advanced Organic Chemistry - The aim of this course is to solidify the student's understanding of certain basic concepts covered in CHEM 2210-2220. Structures of organic compounds, reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry of organic reactions are emphasized. The student will gain a deeper understanding of these topics and insight into the experimental foundation of abstract concepts. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220 and CHEM 3010 (or 3030) or permission of instructor. (3)

4230.Principles of Polymer Chemistry - Topics include polymer solutions, molecular weight measurement, analysis and testing, mechanical properties, polymer structure and physical properties, polymerization methods, and polymer processing. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220/2220D/2240L and CHEM 3010 (or 3030). (3)

4240/4240L.Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis - An introduction to the theories, operations, and applications of spectroscopic, electrochemical, and chromatographic instrumentation in chemical analysis. Students will acquire hands-on experience in the operation and use of several instruments commonly employed in chemical analysis. Students who successfully complete this course will have developed the critical thinking and laboratory skills necessary to apply various instrumentation to the solution of problems in chemical analysis. Laboratory meets in one four-hour session. CHEM 4240 and 4240L must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. (3/1)

4310L.Synthesis Laboratory - Advanced methods in the synthesis and characterization of organic and inorganic compounds; includes an independent project. A wide range of compounds are synthesized, including organic, bioinorganic, organometallic, and coordination compounds. Concepts and principles of green chemistry are introduced and incorporated throughout the course. The student is expected to become skilled in a variety of synthetic and spectroscopic techniques used in a modern chemistry laboratory. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to independently research a synthetic problem and design a procedure to execute that synthesis. The student will also be able to report experimental results using the format approved by the American Chemical Society for publications. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210/3210L. (2)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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COMPUTER SCIENCE (CPSC)

STUDENTS MUST EARN A GRADE OF “C” OR ABOVE TO SATISFY THE PREREQUISITES IDENTIFIED IN THE FOLLOWING COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES.

1005.Introduction to PC's and Software Applications - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introductory computer course offered to non- majors or as a non-departmental elective. Basic hardware/software terminology. Hands-on instruction on business application software covering database management systems, spreadsheets and word processing using contemporary office software such as Microsoft Ò Office. (3)

1710.Computer Science I - Usually offered fall semester. Introduces the fundamental concepts of procedural programming. Topics include data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course also includes an introduction to computers and a history of programming languages. Problem solving techniques and software development are discussed and used in projects. CPSC 1710 has four lectures per week. Prerequisite: completion of all developmental mathematics courses. (4)

1720.Computer Science II - Usually offered spring semester. Introduces the concepts of object-oriented programming to students with a background in the procedural paradigm. A brief review of control structures and data types with an emphasis on structured data types and array processing is presented. The object-oriented paradigm is introduced with emphasis on the definition and use of classes along with the fundamentals of object-oriented design. Other topics include files, basic sorting and searching techniques, fundamental data structures (stacks and queues) and an introduction to software engineering issues. CPSC 1720 has four lectures per week. Prerequisite: CPSC 1710. (4)

1760. Introduction to Programming in C - A survey of the problem solving techniques, strategies and mechanisms available in the C language. Emphasis of the course is on development and implementation of top-down, structured solutions to problems. Topics include basic computer organization, the edit-compile-debug cycle, variable typing, arithmetic operations, basic input and output, functions, control flow mechanisms, arrays, pointers, strings, and structures. Prerequisite: completion of all developmental mathematics courses (3)

1800.Fundamentals of Information Systems - Systems theory, quality, decision making and the organizational role of information systems are introduced. Information technology including computing and telecommunications systems are stressed. Concepts of organization and information system growth and re-engineering are introduced. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics courses. (3)

2005. Advanced PCs & Software Applications – Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An extension of Introduction to PCs & Software Applications (CPSC 1005) with further coverage of business application software. Hands-on instruction of advanced features of an integrated office suite such as Microsoft Office. Projects and presentations related to using the software. Prerequisite: CPSC 1005 or completion of all developmental mathematics courses. (3)

2110/2110L.Logic Design - Usually offered spring semester. Students are introduced to the fundamental operations and components of computers. Topics include: number systems, Boolean algebra and logic gates, simplification of Boolean functions, adders, multipliers, decoders and encoders, PLAs, multiplexers, latches, flip-flops, state diagrams and equations, sequential circuit design, basic computer operation cycle, operand addressing, instruction set design, RISC vs. CISC, and an introduction to HDL and a simple ALU. Prerequisite: CPSC 1710. Corequisite: CPSC 2110L. (3/1)

2120.Introduction to Computer Organization - Students will be introduced to the organization and operation of a computer. Topics include: an introduction to assembly language programming, representation of data including floating point, instruction set encoding, registers and addressing modes, interrupts, busses, controllers, input/output, files, memory hierarchy, and cache replacement strategies. Prerequisites: CPSC 2110 and CPSC 1720. (3)

2730.Data Structures - Usually offered fall semester. Builds on the topics discussed in CPSC 1710 and 1720 to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of data structures and the algorithms derived from them. Topics include recursion, the underlying philosophy of object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), sorting, the basics of algorithmic analysis, and an overview of programming paradigms. Prerequisite: CPSC 1720. (3)

2740.Software Development - Usually offered spring semester. An implementation-oriented introduction to the software development techniques used to create medium-scale interactive applications. Topics include event-driven programming, computer graphics, human-computer interaction, and graphical user interfaces. Students will be required to complete a number of projects, at least one of which will be a team project. Prerequisite: CPSC 2730. (3)

2800.Multimedia - This course introduces students to multimedia concepts, methods, and techniques. Topics include a thorough coverage of web-based graphics, text, audio, and video. Students will gain experience in graphic techniques (including image creation and interactivity), advanced web design (animation, controls, and sound); all by using commercial products within a ‘mock’ web design company. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics courses. (3)

3040.(MATH 3040)Numerical Analysis - Methods of numerical computation. Error analysis, solutions of equations, interpolation and polynomial approximation, least squares approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution to differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 2080 and a working knowledge of some programming language. Corequisite: MATH 2530. (3)

3060.Design and Analysis of Algorithms - Usually offered fall semester. Design and analysis of computer algorithms in terms of space and time complexity, analysis of several advanced search, sort, tree, and graph algorithms; discussion of algorithmic strategies such as divide-and-conquer, greedy, backtracking, and branch-and-bound; introduction to NP-hard and NP-complete problems. Prerequisites: CPSC 2730 and MATH 2550. (3)

3110, 3111, 3112, 3113.Independent Study in Computer Science - Individual or group study in an approved area of computer science. Guidance by one or more members of faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the chairperson. Credit determined by faculty member and chairperson. (0, 1, 2, 3)

3130. Computer Architecture - Usually offered spring semester. This course introduces students to: computer organization, processors, memories, peripherals, study of recent advances in computer architecture, parallelism, hardware, software, and multilevel machines. Prerequisites: CPSC 2110, CPSC 2110L and CPSC 2730. (3)

3140. Operating Systems - Usually offered fall semester. This course introduces students to the design and implementation of operating systems. Topics include: an overview of the components of an operating system, mutual exclusion and synchronization, implementation of processes, scheduling algorithms, memory management, and file systems. Prerequisites: CPSC 2730. (3)

3205.C & UNIX - Familiarization with C and UNIX. Detailed study of C and UNIX with focus on application programming in C in the UNIX environment. Shell programming, UNIX internals and file system. Extensive programming. Prerequisite: CPSC 2740. (3)

3240.Computer Networks - Usually offered spring semester. This course introduces the student to the structure, implementation, and the theory of networks, as well as their applications. Topics include the study of network protocols, network modes, different layers of ISO-OSI model, network topology, routing algorithms, and different types of Local Area and Wide Area Networks. Prerequisite: CPSC 3140. (3)

3601, 3602, 3603, 3604.Topics in Computer Science - Selected topics in computer science, offered as required, contents determined by needs of students in various majors at the time course is offered. Prerequisites depend on the topic. (1, 2, 3, 4)

3710.Databases - Usually offered spring semester. Introduction to database management systems, database architectures; theoretical and applications data definition and query languages; database design and normalization; recovery, security and protection; concurrency; recent advances in databases. Students will be involved in database projects in which at least one is a team project. Prerequisite: CPSC 2740. (3

3900-3905.Computer Science Summer Internship I & II - Offered first summer session. Ten to twelve weeks of experience in industry or government-related jobs. Completion of two internship reports. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: CS or CIS major, completion of 62 degree credit hours (junior standing) and 2.0 or above g.p.a. (3-3)

3950-3955.Summer Undergraduate Research I & II - Offered first summer session. Research participation for Computer Science/Computer Information Systems majors. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: CS or CIS major, sophomore standing, 2.5 gpa or above and permission of the instructor. (3-3)

4100.Automata Theory and Language Translation - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to automata theory and its application to language translation. Topics include: the basic concepts of finite automata, Turing machines and computability; finite state acceptors and regular sets, context-free grammars, and push-down automata. Prerequisites: CPSC 2110, 2740, and MATH 2560. (3)

4301.Computer Graphics - Introduction to computer graphics concepts, two and three dimensional graphics techniques and some advanced techniques such as shading, animation, and polygon filling are studied. Prerequisites: CPSC 3060 and MATH 2030. (3)

4304.Artificial Intelligence - Introduction to the fundamental principles of artificial intelligence. Topics include: knowledge representation, first-order predicate calculus, graph representations, state space search, heuristic search, uncertainty management. Survey of selected Artificial Intelligence application areas. Some programming in Lisp, Prolog, or other language. Prerequisites: CPSC 2740, CPSC 3060, MATH 2030, and PHIL 2040. (3)

4405.Parallel Processing - This course is a general introduction to Parallel Processing and focuses on two levels at which this can be perceived and applied: the hardware/software system level, and the algorithmic and programming level. Topics to be covered include the history of large-scaled computing, the architectural classification, design and algorithms for various machines, and methods for designing programs for parallel machines. Prerequisites: CPSC 3130, CPSC 3140, and CPSC 3060. (3)

4410.Programming Languages - Structural properties of programming languages, semantics of programming languages. A study of contrasts between procedural and applicative languages. A review of languages from different language paradigms that illustrate the principles of programming language theory. Prerequisites: CPSC 2740 and CPSC 4100. (3)

4420.Compiler Design - Compiler organization: lexical, syntactic analysis, symbol tables; parsing algorithms; storage allocation; code generation; code optimization. Design and implementation of a compiler. Prerequisites: CPSC 2740 and CPSC 4100. (3)

4800-4805.Capstone Project - Students are required to complete a significant project that reinforces, through practice, the concepts learned throughout the Computer Science curriculum. Prerequisites: All 3000-level required CPSC courses. (1-2)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

4999P.Senior Comprehensives Programming - (0)

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COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (COED)

2010-2020.Cooperative Education - Full-time work experience in business, industry or government in an area related to student's academic program. Prerequisites: Student must be at least a sophomore in good standing and have the approval of the student's departmental faculty advisor and the Career Services Office. COED 2010 is prerequisite to 2020. (3-3)

2030-2040.Cooperative Education - Part-time work experience in business, industry or government in an area related to the student's academic program. Prerequisites: Student must be at least a sophomore in good standing and have the approval of the student's departmental faculty advisor and the Career Services Office. COED 2030 is prerequisite to 2040. (0-3)

3010-3020.Cooperative Education - Full-time work experience in business, industry or government in an area related to student's academic program. Prerequisites: Student must be in good standing and have the approval of the student's departmental faculty advisor and the Career Services Office, and have six hours of COED credit before enrolling in COED 3010. COED 3010 is prerequisite to 3020. (0-3)

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ECONOMICS (ECON)

1030.*Introduction to Economics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. What economics is all about, the U.S. economy, supply and demand, consumer demand, production and supply decision, market structure, labor markets, the business cycle, aggregate supply and demand, money and banks, the monetary policy vs. the fiscal policy, international trade. (3)

2010.*Principles of Micro Economics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Functioning of market system; supply and demand, theory of the consumer, production and cost theory of the firm; imperfect competition and government regulation. (3)

2020.*Principles of Macro Economics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Measuring national income, measuring inflation (CPI) and unemployment, introduction to the basic macroeconomic model of the quantity theory of money, money supply growth and inflation, Keynesian theory of income, employment and the price level, the neoclassical synthesis, the macro economic impacts of monetary and fiscal policies. (3)

*Students having completed ECON 1030 may not earn credit for ECON 2010 or 2020 without relinquishing ECON 1030 credit.

2070**- 2080.***StatisticsI & II - 2070 usually offered fall semester; 2080 usually offered spring semester. Descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and probability distributions, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, tests for goodness of fit and independence, regression analysis- simple and multiple, regression analysis and model building residual analysis and the Durbin-Watson test, time series analysis, testing stationarity and non-stationarity of a time series, cointegration. Prerequisite: MATH 1030. (3-3)

**Students required to complete ECON 2070 may not earn Departmental credit for other research methods or applied quantitative analysis courses without approval by the Chairperson.

***Mathematics Department majors may substitute MATH 1020 as the prerequisite for ECON 2080.

3010.(FINC 3010) Monetary and Fiscal Policy - Valuation of stocks and bonds, financial institutions, the structure of the interest rates, definitions of money, bank reserves and the money supply, the Federal Reserve System and the tools of the monetary policy, the role of money in an economy, foundation of the monetarist philosophy, the Keynesian framework, the IS–LM system, understanding foreign exchange, Balance of payments. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020. (3)

3080.(FINC 3080) PublicFinance - Organization and administration of revenues and expenditures of all levels of government, provision of public goods, introduction to Public Choice theory. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and 2020. (3)

3091.Economics of Black America - Application of economic theory to situations of African Americans; economic analysis of discrimination; black-white income differentials; human capital hypothesis; investigation of schemes aimed to improve economic status of African Americans. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and 2020. (3)

3110. Intermediate Micro Economics - Extension of ECON 2010; derivation of demand and supply curves, short and long run equilibrium of the firm in competitive and imperfectly competitive markets, resource market analysis, and welfare economics. Prerequisities:  ECON 2010 and 2020. (3)

3120.Intermediate Macro Economics - Extension of ECON 2020; income determination; multipliers; theory of consumption; economic fluctuations; employment analysis; national income analysis; investment theory. Prerequisites: ECON 2020. (3)

3200.(FINC 3200) Managerial Economics - Use of Microeconomic methods as management decision making tools in order to assure the attainment of a firm’s goals and objectives; frequent use of case studies with microeconomic applications. Prerequisites: BSAD 3055 and ECON 2010. (3)

4050.International Economics - The causes and effects of international trade, the gains from trade, Comparative Advantage, the Hecksher-Ohlin Theorem the determination of the terms of trade, the determination of income in the open economy, balance of payments, the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020. (3)

4070.Government and Business - Government regulation and the theory of the business enterprise system. Prerequisites: ECON 2010. (3)

4501, 4502, 4503.Directed Readings in Economics - Reading in area of economics mutually agreed upon by instructor and student which is not covered in current course. Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson . (1, 2, 3)

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EDUCATION

(EDEC, Early Childhood; EDEL, Elementary; EDSC, Secondary; EDSP, Special Education, EDUC, General Education; HLTH, Health; PHED, Physical Education)

Early Childhood Education (EDEC)

2170C.Child Growth and Development - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to delineate the fundamentals and principles of growth and development from pre-natal to adolescence. Field experiences are an integral part of the course. (3)

3060A. (EDUC 3060A)Strategies and Techniques in Elementary School Mathematics - This course is designed to prepare elementary school teacher candidates to become competent professionals who can guide and facilitate classroom interactions to meet the learning needs of diverse populations of students. (3)

3060B. (EDUC 3060B)Strategies and Techniques in Elementary School Mathematics - This course is a continuation of 3060A and concentrates on using technology in teaching mathematics in the elementary classroom. (3)

3140.Materials and Methods of Teaching Math in the Early Childhood Setting - This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to facilitate young children’s learning of mathematical principles, concepts, and operations. Teacher candidates will be able to develop and implement a mathematics curriculum that is appropriate for children between the ages 3-8 years, using developmentally appropriate materials and methods. Field experiences are an integral part of this course. (3)

3150.Methods and Materials in Preschool Education - To prepare the student to utilize traditional and innovative methods and instructional materials for the preschool child. (3)

3160.Curriculum and Experiences for the Preschool Child - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to specify the fundamentals and principles of the varied phases of comprehensive readiness programs and experiences appropriate for the preschool child. (3)

3180.Organization and Administration of Child Development Programs - This course is designed to teach students to organize and administer child development programs. Twenty hours of administrative internship experiences in early childhood education programs are required during this course. (3)

3190.Methods and Materials of Early Childhood Education - At the completion of this course, the teacher candidate will be able to plan curriculum appropriate for the young children using methods and materials that provide young children with opportunities to acquire skills and build competencies in all areas of development. (3)

4050.Practicum in Nursery/Kindergarten - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply knowledge, skills and abilities in centers for preschool children. Prerequisites: EDEC 2170 and 3190. (3)

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Elementary Education (EDEL)

2061.Foundations of Curriculum - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to select and organize the components required within the elementary educational curriculum, to develop and utilize methods, materials, and media in the classroom. The student will be able to survey, understand, and evaluate instructional techniques and procedures that aid in effective teaching and teacher/subject competency. Fifteen hours of field experiences are required. (3)

2400.Nutrition(BIOL 2400) - At the completion of this course, the student will have a basic knowledge of techniques and materials for teaching nutrition. Students will become knowledgeable consumers of nutrients and nutrition information. Course content includes: nutrition as a foundation for health; the importance of food in the human body; the nature and composition of food; release and utilization of nutrients; planning the daily diet and the process of digestion and absorption. (3)

3020.Methods of Teaching Elementary School - At the end of this course, the student will be able to effectively plan and implement lessons for the elementary classroom. Emphasis will be given to the contents of language arts, social studies, mathematics, and science. The student will learn how to implement the prevailing trends in pedagogy while studying the national standards and local frameworks. A minimum of twenty (20) field experience hours are required. (3)

3050A-3050B.Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Reading - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to develop and implement a comprehensive classroom reading program. A balanced literacy approach that focuses on the five core components of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension is emphasized. . Ten hours of field experiences are included. (3-3)

3071.Curriculum Applications I - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to use instructional methods, materials, and media specific to the elementary education pre-service teacher. Course focus will include the integrated language arts and effective ways of teaching social studies. Ten hours of field experiences are required. (3)

3081.Curriculum Applications II - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to use instructional methods, materials, and media specific to the elementary education pre-service teacher. Course focus will include effective strategies for teaching of mathematics and science. Ten hours of field experiences are required. (3)

4270.Guidance Techniques for Elementary Teachers - At the completion of this course, the student will understand the psychological and philosophical bases for a school guidance program. Emphasis is on understanding and being able to use diagnostic techniques with groups and individuals. Understanding the purpose and practice of parental consultation is stressed. (3)

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Secondary Education (EDSC)

3010.Secondary Education - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to describe the historical development, the administrative and the instructional organization of secondary schools. Based on theory, the student will plan and practice instructional techniques through micro and field experiences. (3)

3020A - 3020B.Music in the Junior-Senior High School - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to prepare materials to be used in music instruction and demonstrate historical, experimental and other pedagogical strategies in the teaching of choral, instrumental, and general music as well as to evaluate the music curriculum at the secondary level. (3-2)

3021, 3022, 3023.Special Methods - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to plan, evaluate, and use instructional strategies suited to the academic disciplines studied. (1, 2, 3)

3023B.Methods of Teaching Biology - This course is designed to prepare preservice high school biology teachers to use instructional methods, materials, and laboratory equipment common to the biological sciences. Course focus will include the methods of setting up a biology laboratory, laboratory safety, laboratory methods, equipment, and effective ways of teaching biology. (3)

3023C.Methods of Teaching Chemistry - This course is designed to prepare preservice high school chemistry teachers to use instructional methods, materials, and laboratory equipment common to the biological sciences. Course focus will include the methods of setting up a chemistry laboratory, laboratory safety, laboratory methods, equipment, and effective ways of teaching chemistry. (3)

3023M.Methods of Teaching Mathematics - This course is designed to prepare secondary mathematics teachers to become competent professionals who can guide and facilitate classroom interactions to meet the learning needs of diverse populations of students. (3)

3023S.Methods of Teaching History and Social Studies - This course provides an overview of the methods and materials currently used in secondary social studies education. A focus will be placed on developing skills that will aid in designing instruction that effectively impacts the learning of all students and integrating technology in the teaching and learning process. All course assignments and objectives will relate to meeting the needs of diverse learners. Planning for the school year, course of study, designing units and lesson plans, and effective instruction are addressed. (3)

4150.Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to implement an effective secondary school reading program. Writing, study skills and reasoning are emphasized through subject area material. Ten hours of field experiences are required. (3)

4261, 4262, 4263.Contemporary Trends in Secondary Education - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and describe current movements in instructional methods. (1, 2, 3)

4061T.Student Teaching (Middle School and Secondary Education Majors) (9) - This course includes:

  • Observation and participation in classroom;
  • Full-time participation in instructional activities and other teaching assignments;
  • Readings and experiences in classroom management and teaching techniques;
  • Readings and experiences in school administration as it relates to classroom teaching;

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Special Education (EDSP)

2040.Introduction to Exceptional Children - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to relate basic concepts, current issues, and future trends in Special Education which provides basic information for the elementary education major and a foundation for further study for the special education major. An overview of each area of exceptionality is included as well as historical development, basic concepts, current issues and programs, and future trends in special education. (3)

2041.Introduction to Children with Mild/Moderate Handicaps - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to discuss the historical development of Special Education. Using a generic approach, the student will be able to contrast and compare methods of assessing, diagnosing, placing and programming for students who are classified as mild/moderate in the school system. (3)

2042.Vocational and Transition Services for Students with Disabilities - Organization and design of training programs to promote independence, vocational and community adjustment of persons with disabilities; curriculum materials, methods and organizational strategies for adolescent and adult learners, families and community service providers. (3)

2044. (EDUC 2044) Methods of Classroom Organization and Management - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to manipulate those variables that affect classroom management: space, time, multiplicity of tasks, difficulty level, language, and interpersonal relationships. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

3040.Behavioral Approaches to Managing the Mild/Moderate - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to observe, record and write behavioral objectives, establish contingencies, and implement social and academic programs for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

3041.Methods of Teaching Basic Subjects to the Mild/Moderate - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply the clinical teaching cycle in writing curriculum based instruction. A theme plan of instruction will be emphasized. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

3042.Methods of Designing and Assessing Materials for the Mild/Moderate - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to design, construct, and evaluate both teacher-made and manufactured materials including computer software. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

4031.Practicum in Tests and Measurement - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to interpret pupil appraisal regulations as contained in Bulletin 1508. Students will also be involved in the administration and scoring of formal tests and the construction, administration, and interpretation of informal tests. A written case history will be required. Sixty hours of field experience required. (3)

4041.Humanistic Approaches to Managing the Mild/Moderate - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply a psycho dynamic approach to social behaviors. The student will use a variety of therapies: art, music, drama, as well as reality therapy. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

4042.Methods of Teaching Students with Learning/Behavior Problems - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to apply actual diagnostic-prescriptive teaching in a micro teaching setting. Students will be able to write and implement IEP's. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

4043.Mainstreaming Practicum - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to identify, assess, diagnose, and implement the I E P of a student who is mainstreamed or included in a regular classroom. Sixty hours of field experience required. (3)

4060T.Student Teaching (Special Education Majors ) (9) - This course includes:

  • Observation and participation in classroom;
  • Full-time participation in instructional activities and other teaching assignments;
  • Readings and experiences in classroom management and teaching techniques;
  • Readings and experiences in school administration as it relates to classroom teaching.

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Education (EDUC) (General Education)

1000. Teacher Prep - Sessions to prepare students for the professional teacher education examinations. A grade of P is given for students who successfully complete the practice session. (0)

1050. Introduction to Schools, Culture & Society/Practicum - This course introduces students to teaching as a profession. It provides a broad interdisciplinary examination of the school-society relationship in America and of the many issues, particularly cultural, embedded in this relationship. Additionally, this course will help prepare the student to understand and critically evaluate the institutional goals, policies, and practices that surround and shape classroom practice. Field experience hours are required. (3)

1070.Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and describe the major positions in philosophy and significant historical developments in education and relate these to current viewpoints and contemporary practices. (3)

1100. Instructional Technology - Usually offered fall semester. The course outline will begin with where the students are in educational technological expertise. Through an individualized approach, all students will learn word processing, databases, graphics, and management applications for microcomputers in DOS/Windows or Macintosh operating systems. After these basics, students will learn basic hypertext authoring incorporating multimedia elements. The course features an introduction to online communication, e-mail, and the Internet. The course will present strategies for evaluating and using software in specific curricular settings. A course project based on the grade level and disciplinary interests of the students will be the final product of the course. (3)

2005R.Praxis PPST Reading - Students must register for this part of the Praxis during the semester that they officially plan to take the test. A grade of P is recorded on the student's transcript for a passing grade and NG for a score below the state qualifying score. (0)

2005W.Praxis PPST Writing - Students must register for this part of the Praxis during the semester that they officially plan to take the test. A grade of P is recorded on the student's transcript for a passing grade and NG for a score below the state qualifying score. (0)

2005M.Praxis PPST Math - Students must register for this part of the Praxis during the semester that they officially plan to take the test. A grade of P is recorded on the student's transcript for a passing grade and NG for a score below the state qualifying score. (0)

2020.Exploring Science in PK-12 - This course is a joint effort between faculty in the Division of Education and the Departments of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology. It is designed both for those students who are exploring science teaching careers as well as those pursuing science careers. Field experiences will be an integral part of this course and will provide students opportunities to observe science teaching as well as plan inquiry based lessons. (3)

2025.(PSYC 3020)Child Psychology - At the completion of this course the student will be able to identify and describe the physiological, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral factors which affect child growth and development.

Prerequisite: PSYC 1010. (3)

2030.Children's Literature - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to select materials based on the interests of children of varying ages and background. The students will develop these skills using simulation, micro-teaching, and practicum. (3)

2044. (EDSP 2044) Methods of Classroom Organization and Management - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to manipulate those variables that affect classroom management: space, time, multiplicity of tasks, difficulty level, language, and interpersonal relationships. Twenty hours of field experience required. (3)

3005L. Principles of Learning and Teaching Praxis II - Students must register for the Praxis II during the semester that they officially plan to take the test. A grade of P is recorded on the student's transcript for a passing grade and NG for a score below the state qualifying score. (0)

3030.Philosophy of Education - This course is designed to prepare the student to develop his/her own philosophy of education through the study of current philosophies, methods of philosophical analysis, and evaluation of movements in education. (3)

3040.(PSYC 3040)Educational Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. This course is designed to prepare the student to identify and describe the cognitive and affective factors influencing the learning process through the study of the nature, conditions, outcome, and evaluation of learning. Systems approach, media, and clinical experiences are used. (3)

3060A. (EDEC 3060A)Strategies and Technology in Elementary School Mathematics - This course is designed to prepare elementary school teacher candidates to become competent professionals who can guide and facilitate classroom interactions to meet the learning needs of diverse populations of students. Field experiences are an integral part of this course. (3)

3060B. (EDEC 3060B)Strategies and Technology in Elementary School Mathematics - This course is a continuation of 3060A and concentrates on using technology in teaching mathematics in the elementary classroom. Field experiences are an integral part of this course. (3)

3200. Middle School Teaching Strategies - This course is designed to prepare middle school teacher candidates to become competent professionals who can guide and facilitate classroom interactions to meet the learning needs of diverse populations of students in the middle school environment. Field experiences are an integral part of this course. (3)

4001, 4002, 4003.Directed Project in Education - Register only with permission of chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4011, 4012, 4013.Directed Readings in Education - Register only with permission of chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4030.Educational Measurement and Evaluation - This course is designed to prepare the student to employ elementary statistical methods in the interpretation of test measurement; to construct and use various types of tests and measurement scales; and to utilize tests in the diagnosis and remediation of student performance. (3)

4060S.Student Teaching Seminar (0) (All Education Majors) - This seminar will include weekly meetings to discuss the student teaching experience. Students will exchange ideas and provide assistance to each other along with the professor providing guidance throughout the semester. Students will develop lesson plans and behavior management plans to work with disruptive students. To be taken concurrently with student teaching

4065.Student Teaching (All Education Majors) (12) or

4060A.Student Teaching (Elem. and Early Childhood Education Majors) (9) - This course includes:

  • Observation and participation in classroom;
  • Full-time participation in instructional activities and other teaching assignments;
  • Readings and experiences in classroom management and teaching techniques;
  • Readings and experiences in school administration as it relates to classroom teaching.

4090.(PSYC 4090)Adolescent Psychology - At the completion of this the student will identify and describe characteristics and attendant problems of adolescent growth and development and to utilize relevant techniques in teaching and guidance based on modern research. (3)

4100.Audio-Visual Education - This course prepares the student to select, organize, and use audio-visual materials and equipment based on curriculum and community needs; current AV holdings and how they are cared for; future curriculum and aids available. (3)

4113R.Clinical Procedures in Remedial Reading in the Elementary School - At the completion of this course, the student will be able to diagnose and remediate reading difficulties. Informal and formal diagnostic techniques will be included. Opportunities for remedial tutoring of disabled readers in a laboratory setting are provided. Ten hours of field experiences required. (3)

4120.Principles of Guidance - This course prepares the student to apply individual and group guidance techniques and activities based on student needs which can be administered though student services.. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (3)

4200.Multicultural Education - This course is designed with emphasis on the pluralistic aspect of society as it relates to schools, teaching, learning and the development of curriculum considerations for elementary and secondary areas of education. Candidates will be introduced to learning styles and various teaching techniques to meet the needs of all learners at their appropriate grade levels. (3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - Required senior comprehensive for education majors. Majors who have successfully passed all required sections of the N.T.E. including the specialty area for certification before their last semester are exempt from the comprehensive. (0)

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Health (HLTH)

1141.First Aid and C.P.R. - At the completion of this course, students will have earned certification in Community First Aid, Safety and CPR. (1)

2130.Personal and Environmental Health - At the completion of this course, students will have gained an understanding of the various aspects of implementation of procedures, policies, accident prevention techniques, and remedial action necessary for living a healthy, long life. (3)

2200.Comprehensive Health - At the completion of this course students will have been provided with knowledge of current health trends and issues on a vast number of contemporary health topics. (3)

2281.General Safety Education - At the completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the basic principles of safety education in all areas of safety as well as development of safety skills, habits, and attitudes to prevent accidents. (3)

3090. School Health Program - At the completion of this course, students will understand the history, scope, needs and basic principles underlying the study of health and health education. (3)

3210.Basic Health Science - At the completion of this course, students will understand the fundamental principles and importance of personal hygiene and good health habits. They will also become more aware of contemporary health issues. (3)

3220.General Health and Safety Education - At the completion of this course, students will understand the theory, teaching procedures, and supervisory techniques connected with school and community health and safety. (2)

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Physical Education (PHED)

Physical Education (PHED) Academic Courses  

2011. Elementary School Physical EducationPracticum - At the completion of this course, students will have learned how to make practical applications of the theories of physical education through actual teaching experiences in the elementary schools. Prerequisite: PHED 2015. (1)

2015. Elementary School Physical Education - At the completion of this course, students will have been provided with knowledge of general procedures needed to develop competencies for class organization and methods of teaching physical education in grades K-8. Physical education majors and minors must complete an on-site Practicum at an assigned elementary school. (3)

2120.Adaptive Physical Education - At the completion of this course, students will have acquired knowledge of the basic concepts of organization and conducting physical education programs for the mentally, physically, emotionally and/or socially disabled child. (3)

2130.Anatomy and Physiology - At the completion of this course, students will understand the normal functioning of the human body, the interrelationship of organs and organ systems, and their relationship to the function of the human body. Prerequisite: BIOL 1030/1030L and 1040/1040L (3)

3030.Physiology of Exercise - At the completion of this course, students will recognize the basic physiological concepts of the body, and the relationships of activity and fitness to health. Prerequisite: PHED 2130. (3)

3190.Methods and Materials of Health and Physical Education and Safety - At the completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the appropriate methods, selection, development, and use of materials for teaching K-12 grades physical education, health and safety. (3)

3200.Sports in American Society - At the completion of this course, students will have acquired an understanding of the historical developments, trends, laws, philosophical views and societal issues of physical education and sports in America. (3)

3240.Kinesiology - At the completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the human mechanism necessary for movement, together with the ability to analyze and evaluate motor skills. Prerequisite: PHED 3030. (3)

4240.Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries - At the completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the preventive measures, and prompt, adequate treatment of sports injuries. (3)

4310.History and Principles of Physical Education - At the completion of this course, students will understand the nature and scope of physical education, including philosophy, history and profession principles. (3)

4320.Driver Education and Traffic Safety - This course is designed to assist prospective teachers in analysis of the driving task, understanding theory and gaining "behind-the-wheel" teaching experience. (3)

4340S.Seminar in Health and Physical Education - At the completion of this course, students will have a comprehensive view of teaching physical education, including an understanding of the professional requirements, current literature, and budget planning. (3)

4350.Tests and Measurements in Health and Physical Education - At the completion of this course, students will have a basic understanding of statistical methods. The student will have laboratory test experiences in physical fitness and motor ability skills. (3)

4360.Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Safety Education - At the completion of this course, students will have an understanding of the administration of a physical education program, including program planning, evaluation of students, as well as public and professional relations. (3)

4390.Curriculum Innovation in Safety and Instructional Devices - At the completion of this course, students will know how to organize and administer a driver education program. Students will become proficient in the use of simulators, behind the wheel instruction, and other techniques used in driver education. Prerequisites: HLTH 2281 and PHED 4320. (4)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - A comprehensive exam for physical education majors designed to test students’ knowledge of the major. Majors passing all required sections of the National Teachers Exam including the specialty areas for certification before the semester in which they would take the comprehensive exam, are exempt from this exam.(0)

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Physical Education (PHED)

*Test-Out Courses

*Upon completion of a test-out course, students will have successfully performed and passed at least 70% of the skills required for their respective sport. Test-out courses fulfill the core curriculum physical education requirement but do not offer academic credit.

0990B.Physical Education Requirement Basketball - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in basketball. (0)

0990V.Physical Education Requirement Volleyball - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in volleyball. (0)

0990T.Physical Education Requirement Tennis - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in tennis. (0)

0990M.Physical Education Requirement Stunt/Tumbling - New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in stunts/tumbling. (0)

0990G.Physical Education RequirementGymnastics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in gymnastics. (0)

0990S.Physical Education RequirementSwimming - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in swimming. (0)

0990F.Physical Education RequirementFolk Dancing - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. New freshman and new transfer students' skills test in folk dance. (0)

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Activity Courses

1010.Introduction to Team Games - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in soccer and basketball. (1)

1020.Introduction to Team Games - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in volleyball and softball. (1)

1030.Techniques - At the completion of this course, students will be able to proficiently execute a variety of fundamental motor skills (fine and gross motor). These skills will be developed through participating in play, low organized games, lead-up games, rhythm activity, relays, and board games. This is an excellent course for individuals interested in a different approach to physical education. (2)

1041.Basic Aerobics - At the completion of this course, students will be able to proficiently execute a variety of dance routines and display knowledge competency in aerobic exercise. (1)

1050.Beginning Tennis - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in tennis. (1)

1070.Folk Dancing - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency perform a variety of fundamental steps in traditional folk dances. (1)

1200.Step Aerobics - Development of cardiovascular conditioning through aerobic exercise and dance routines. (1)

1210.Volleyball and Basketball - At the completion of this course, the students will have an understanding of basic techniques, strategies, and rules of volleyball and basketball. (1)

2020.Golf - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in golf. (1)

2040.Stunts and Tumbling - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and skill proficiency in executing fundamental stunts and tumbling. (1)

2050.Gymnastics - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in executing fundamental apparatus and mat skills. (1)

2080.Modern Dance - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in executing fundamental modern dance movements. (2)

2090.Advanced Modern Dance - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in advanced modern dance movements. Prerequisite: PHED 2080. (2)

2140.Fundamentals of Swimming - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in fundamental swimming skills. (1)

2145.Intermediate Swimming - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in the basic swimming strokes. Prerequisite: PHED 2140 or permission of instructor. (1)

2150.Advanced Swimming - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in the advanced strokes and lifesaving techniques. Prerequisite: PHED 2145. (1)

2160.Archery and Badminton - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in archery and badminton. (2)

2400.Beginning Karate - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in karate. (3)

2410.Intermediate Karate - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in intermediate karate skills. Prerequisite: PHED 2400. (3)

2420.Advanced Karate - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and fundamental skill proficiency in advanced karate skills. Prerequisite: PHED 2400 and PHED 2410. (3)

3070.Major Team Sports - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge and competencies in coaching techniques and strategies for a variety of major team sports. (2)

3080.Team and Individual Sports - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge and competencies in coaching techniques and strategies for a variety of team and individual sports. (2)

3120.Advanced Tennis - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge, competency and proficiency in advanced tennis skills. PHED 1050 or passing score in PHED 0990TE. (2)

4260.Coaching and Officiating Major Team Sports - At the completion of this course, students will be able to display knowledge and competencies in officiating mechanics and techniques for coaching team and individual sports. (3)

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ENGLISH (ENGL)

Prerequisites for English courses

Completion of a 1000-level sequence for the 2000-level
Completion of a 2000-level course for the 3000-level
Completion of a 2000-level course and one 3000-level course for the 4000-level

All English courses enhance students' skills in writing and critical thinking. In addition, these courses will specifically reinforce the Core Curriculum's objectives of introducing students to the common elements of the human heritage and assisting students to develop a system of values.

0990.Preparatory English - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Introduces students to the revision process, expository writing, and research. Includes individual tutorial in the Writing Center. (3 hours non-degree credit)

1010.English Composition and Rhetoric - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A course in expository writing to enable students to write in different genres and in various media for multiple audiences and purposes including research. (3)

1020.English Composition and Literature - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. This course uses different genres of writing to respond to fiction, poetry, and drama with emphasis on the longer paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. (3)

1023H.Introduction to Literature for Honors Students - Usually offered fall semester. A study of writing and literary genre (the novel, short story, poetry, and drama) for selected students. (3)

2010.Introduction to World LiteratureI - Usually offered every semester. A critical examination of masterpieces of literature from Ancient Mesopotamia through the Renaissance, including at least one non-Western work. Prerequisite: ENGL 1020. (3)

2011H.Introduction to World Literature - Usually offered spring semester. A critical examination of masterpieces of literature from Ancient Mesopotamia through the Renaissance, including at least one non-Western work, for selected students. Prerequisite: ENGL 1023H (or see discussion of AP credit under Honors in English). (3)

THE FRESHMAN ENGLISH SEQUENCE (ENGL 1010-1020 OR 1023H-2011H) IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL COURSES IN ENGLISH NUMBERED 2020 OR ABOVE.

2020.Introduction to World LiteratureII - Usually offered every semester. A critical examination of masterpieces of Western and non-Western literature from the eighteenth century through the post-modern period. (3)

2070.Survey of British Literature I - Usually offered fall semester. A study of English literature from the Middle Ages through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century. (3)

2080.Survey of British Literature II - Usually offered spring semester. A study of English literature from 1800 to the present. (3).

2141, 2143.(WRIT 2141, WRIT 2143) Journal Practicum - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Students gain hands-on experience in publishing. No prerequisite. Permission of the instructor required for 3 hours. Course may be repeated for credit. (1,3)

2200.Modern English Grammars - This course is designed to give students some theoretical understanding of English syntax as well as the uses of Edited American English. Students will learn to manipulate their use of language at the sentence level for specific purposes and audiences, to edit their own writing confidently, and to analyze written texts. Other outcomes will enable students to understand some learners’ difficulty with grammar, to look beyond their surface errors, and to understand the difficulties ESL students have with English grammar. Throughout the course, students will read and analyze student and professional writing. (3)

3001, 3002, 3003, 3004.Special Topics - Some topics considered for this course include Law and Literature, African American Literature, and Post-Colonial Novel. (1, 2, 3,4)

3010.Medieval Literature - A study of the literary developments in English poetry from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Renaissance. (3)

3021.Renaissance Literature - A study of Renaissance prose, poetry and drama (excluding Shakespeare). Also includes Milton. (3)

3040.Shakespeare - Usually offered fall semester. An examination of the comedies and the histories. (3)

3050.Shakespeare - Usually offered spring semester. An examination of the tragedies. (3)

3070.Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature - A study of the major imaginative literature from 1660 to 1800. (3)

3125.Twentieth Century Women Writers - A study of literature and feminist theory by women writers from approximately 1900 to the present. (3)

3135.Language: History and Theory - This course is an introduction to linguistic concepts including morphology, syntax, semantics/pragmatics, language history, language acquisition, language and the brain, and language and society. Examples of these concepts will come from the English language: its history, development, and variations. The goal of this course is to orient secondary education pre-service teachers in the different areas and aspects of the English language. Emphasis is on understanding language variety, production, and change. (3)

3150.Advanced Writing - Practice in critical, scholarly, and expository writing, with emphasis on writing within the discipline of English. (3)

3160.Survey of American Literature I - Usually offered fall semester. A study of the literature and backgrounds of American literature from the colonial time through the Civil War. (3)

3170.Survey of American Literature II - Usually offered spring semester. A study of the literature and backgrounds of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 3160. (3)

3175. (AFAM 3375) Survey of African Literature - Introduction to African folklore, poetry, fiction, and drama. (3)

3185.Special Topics in African American Literature - Genres studied in this course include drama, poetry, and fiction. Major topics (such as Harlem Renaissance, the Slave Narrative, and Toni Morrison) to be announced. This course may be repeated for credit as often as a different topic is available. (3)

3210.Romantic Literature - A study of Romantic poetry and prose, 1800-1832. (3)

3221.Victorian and Early Twentieth Century Literature - A study of Victorian prose, poetry, and novels. (3)

3233.Teaching Composition and Literature - Study of theories and practice of teaching composition and literature at the secondary and upper elementary levels. Also attention to the necessity and uses of Standard American English, to the integrity of Black English, and to learning styles distinctive of some African Americans. Students will teach in the class, demonstrating language arts lessons of their own design, and evaluate representative samples of younger students’ writing. (3)

3270.British Literature from World War I - A study of post-war English poetry, prose, novels, and drama. (3)

3275.The Post-Colonial Novel - Usually offered once a year, usually in the spring. Introduces Post-Colonial theory and novels from 1960 to the present, representing such areas as the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, and Oceania. (3)

3280.18th and 19th Century Survey of African American Writers - A study of major texts from the earliest to DuBois in their historical, cultural and literary contexts. (3)

3290.(AFAM 3290)20th Century Survey of African American Writers - A study of major African American texts of the twentieth century, from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary. (3)

3310.Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of Writing - This course is intended to introduce students to the theory and practice of rhetoric and composition with the intent of preparing the students for becoming teachers of writing. Students will be introduced to the history of rhetoric, theories of composition, and current models for teaching writing. Concerns such as Grammar and Writing, Reading and Writing, Dialect and Writing, and ESL and Writing will also be discussed. Students will be required to practice much of the writing theory they are introduced to through journaling, group and individual writing assignments, and assignments for their course portfolios. Students will also create mini-lessons to be practiced in class. Students are also required to perform 15 hours of observations (combined with some instruction opportunities) in middle and/or secondary schools. (3)

3320.Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature - Focusing on the pedagogy of literature in an integrated curriculum, this course will investigate the reading process and different reading models. It will examine different approaches to reading verbal and non-verbal texts and to teaching adult and young adult literature within the context of contemporary literary theory. Students will be required to perform 15 hours of observations (combined with some instruction opportunities) in middle and/or secondary schools. (3)

3400.Literary Criticism and Theory - A study of interpretive strategies and theoretical assumptions of various approaches to literary criticism. (3)

4000H.Directed Studies - Concentrated study of major figures and ideas in a selected period. Open to selected students only. (3)

4010S.British Literature Seminar - Intensive study of major figures and ideas in a selected period of English Literature. Recent topics included Romantic and Victorian literature. (3)

4020S.American Literature Seminar - Intensive study of major figures and ideas in a select period of American Literature. Recent topics included Regionalism in American Literature, and Henry James: Novel into Film. (3)

4030S.Poetry Seminar - An intensive study in American, British, or world literature. Recent topics have included the Women Poets and Modern Poetry. (3)

4040S.Drama Seminar - A concentrated study of British, American, and European drama with emphasis on critical reading and analysis of major works. Topics have included Self Against Society on the Continental Stage, and Contemporary British Drama. (3)

4050S.Comparative Literature Seminar - A critical study of the forms and themes of the major foreign literature in translation. Topics have included The Image of Woman in Nineteenth Century Literature and Reading and Writing the Other (Third and First World Literatures juxtaposed). (3)

4060S.African American Literature Seminar - Intensive study of major figures, periods, and ideas in African American literature. (3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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ENGINEERING (ENGR)

1061.(PHYS 1061)Modern Engineering Graphics - Usually offered every semester. An introduction to the basic techniques and concepts of engineering drawing including plane and descriptive geometry orthographic, isometric, sectional views auxiliary views, and dimensional representations, and generating 2D and 3D computer designs. One hour of lecture and four hours of drawing and computer laboratory per week. (3)

2020.(PHYS 3020)Mechanics-Dynamics - Usually offered fall semester. Systematic presentation of elements of classical mechanics using language of vector algebra and vector calculus. Topics include kinematics, kinetics, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. (3)

2120.(PHYS 3120)Network Analysis I - Usually offered spring semester. An introduction to the analysis of linear, time-invariant circuits in response to steady-state and time-varying signals using various analytical tools including Kirchhoff's laws, and Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and 2630 and MATH 2030 and 2080. (3)

2210.(PHYS 3210)Mechanics-Statics - Usually offered fall semester. Analysis of systems and bodies considering the fundamental concepts of statics, including vectors, two-dimensional and three-dimensional force systems, equilibrium, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. (3)

2630.(PHYS 2630)Analytical Methods for Physics and Engineering - An introduction of methods of mathematical physics used in physics and engineering such as vector and tensor analysis, Fourier analysis techniques, phasors, special functions, variation subject to constraints and elementary renormalization group techniques. The topics are introduced in the context of specific physics and engineering problems in electricity and magnetism, network analysis, modern physics, thermodynamics and mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. Corequisite: MATH 2530. (3)

3010.(PHYS 3010)Electricity and Magnetism - Usually offered fall semester. A complete development of electromagnetic theory beginning with the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism, culminating with the development of Maxwell's equations, and ending with a treatment of plane electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121, PHYS 2630, MATH 2030, and MATH 2080. (3)

3030. (PHYS 3030)Optics - Usually offered fall semester. Study of theories of geometrical and physical optics, including reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization, double-refraction, and lasers. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 or 2020 and MATH 2070. (3)

3040. (PHYS 3040) Thermodynamics - Usually offered spring semester. Study of heat and temperature, the thermodynamics laws, work, ideal gases, engines, refrigeration, reversibility, entropy, phase transitions. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121, or PHYS 2020 and MATH 2030. (3)

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP (ENTR)

1020. Introduction to Entrepreneurship/Intrapreneurship - Exposes students to the knowledge and skills required to be a successful entrepreneur/intrapreneur. Topics include: challenges of entrepreneurship/intrapreneurship, marketing and financial concerns, and management issues. Students will have the opportunity to interact with local entrepreneurs and to complete a business plan. (3)

1030. (ACCT 1030) Survey of Accounting – Familiarize students with the use of accounting data as a decision making tool. Accounting statements and ratios pertaining to analyses of situations which students will encounter in business will be used. This course is open to students working on a minor in Business Administration, Sales and Marketing or Entrepreneurship. (3)

2050.(SMKT 2050) Principles of Marketing - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Basic course. Nature and scope of modern marketing management; outlines the areas in which decisions are made in developing and implementing price, distribution, product, and promotion strategies. (3)

2060.(MGT 2060) Principles of Management - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An integrated overview of the fundamentals of managerial decision making with a focus on developing the skills necessary to identify problems that confront managers who then must apply the necessary tools (both analytical and intuitive) to foment solutions that coalesce with the firm’s goals and objectives. Topics include the importance of teamwork, motivation, leadership, and ethics. Prerequisite: ENGL 1020. (3)

3021. Financial Management for Entrepreneurs - This course introduces the student to various aspects of financing an entrepreneurial venture. Included topics are: attracting seed and growth capital from sources such as venture capital, investment banking, government, commercial banks, and credit unions. Among the issues discussed are capital budgeting decision making techniques, financial analysis, cost of capital, and the time value of money. (3) 

3780. (MGT 3780) Organization and Operation of a Small Business - An examination of methods that investigate the complexity of management practices in general entrepreneurship with a perspective that can explore the marketplace for successful venture opportunities. Strong emphasis is given to learning the skill factors related to planning, marketing, managing, and financing small business ventures. A two- to five-member team working with a local area entrepreneurial client will develop a comprehensive consulting report including a full business plan. Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors only or permission of the instructor.

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FINANCE (FINC)

1070.*Personal Finance - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Basics of budgeting and consumer purchases; evaluation of costs and benefits of housing and transportation; tax planning; comparison of investment and insurance choices; retirement and estate planning. (3)

___________
*May not be used as a Finance concentration elective.

3010. (ECON 3010) Monetary and Fiscal Policy - Valuation of stocks and bonds, financial institutions, the structure of the interest rates, definitions of money, bank reserves and the money supply, the Federal Reserve System and the tools of the monetary policy, the role of money in an economy, foundation of the monetarist philosophy, the Keynesian framework, the IS–LM system, understanding foreign exchange, Balance of payments. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020. (3)

3050.Corporate Finance - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introduction to the theories and applications of financial decision-making and effects towards valuation. Topics include time value of money, valuation methodologies, capital budgeting, and forecasting. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 or ECON 2020; ACCT 1020. (3

3060.International Financial Management - Usually offered fall semester. Study of the management of the financial resources of the multinational firm; focuses on the international business environment and financial decision-making in an international context. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3)

3070.Financial Institution Operations and Management - Usually offered fall semester. An examination of the role of commercial banking and other financial intermediaries in the economy with applied analysis of bank operations and management; including bank capital structure, the deposit and lending functions, financial institution portfolio management, and other decisions that affect value to the financial institution. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3)

3080. (ECON 3080) Public Finance - Organization and administration of revenues and expenditures of all levels of government, provision of public goods, introduction to Public Choice theory. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and 2020. (3)

3110.Principles of Real Estate - This course examines the principles of purchasing, owning, and managing real estate. Topics include valuation and financing of commercial, industrial, and residential properties; supply and demand factors influencing real estate; historic properties; and real estate development. (3)

3130.Principles of Insurance - This course presents an overview to principles of risk management and the various fields of insurance, including Life, Health, Property & Casualty, Automobile, and Social Insurance programs. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3

3160.Advanced Financial Management - Usually offered spring semester. Analysis of decision-making techniques using quantitative tools and computer applications. Students gain insights into financial strategies and decisions using case studies. Topics include financial planning, working capital management, dividend policy, and mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3)

3170.Investments - Usually offered spring semester. Students are introduced to securities and capital markets. Topics include principles of risk and return, stock and bond valuation, mutual funds and security analysis. Students gain practical experience to investments through trading simulations. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3)

3180.Derivatives and Risk Management - Focuses on the valuation, uses and regulation of derivative instruments (forwards, futures, options, swaps, etc) that are used by corporate managers and individuals investors to control financial risk. Prerequisite: FINC 3050. (3)

3200.(ECON 3200) Managerial Economics - Use of Microeconomic methods as management decision making tools in order to assure the attainment of a firm’s goals and objectives; frequent use of case studies with microeconomic applications. Prerequisites: BSAD 3055 and ECON 2010. (3)

4000.Seminar in Portfolio Management - Demonstration of portfolio analysis techniques using computer applications. Additional topics will focus on option pricing, futures markets, technical analysis, and international portfolio management. References for the course will be developed from classical works as well as recent journal articles. Prerequisites: FINC 3050 and 3170. (3)

4999.(BSAD 4999) Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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FRENCH (FREN)

1010-1020.Elementary French - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introductory course for students with little or no previous training in French. Emphasis upon the four skills of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Basic vocabulary and grammatical structures appropriate to the development of intermediate-level communication. Present, past, and future tenses, description, basic competency for simple social and work situations. (3-3)

2010-2020.Intermediate French - 2010 usually offered fall semester; 2020 usually offered spring semester. Continuing development of the four skills of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Study of selected texts and cultural materials. Web-based study of cultural and social tasks, with extensive student oral reports. Films, computer drills, and audio-visuals required. Readings from texts by Francophone writers, especially North African (2 nd. semester.)Prerequisites: FREN 1010-1020 or equivalent as determined by placement exam. (3-3)

3001-3002.Advanced Grammar and Composition - Intensive review of grammar. Emphasis is on verbs, idioms, the subjunctive, and the spoken language. Extensive use of films and readings to place structures under study in context, Prerequisites: FREN 2020 or permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3-3)

3010.French Medieval and Renaissance Literature - A survey of literary and cultural documents written in Western Europe, with emphasis upon the literary traditions in Latin and the vernacular. From the Benedictine Rule to the Book of the City of Ladies by Christine de Pisan, students situate texts within their cultural context to understand both the impact of such texts upon the society which produced them and the effect of the social milieu upon literary production. Modern French versions of vernacular texts and translations of Latin works such as the Rule, the poetry of the Goliards, and the Sermon on the Song of Songs of St. Bernard Clairvaux. The influence of the classical period, upon the rise of Renaissance literature. The lyric poets; the Pleiade. This course may be expanded to two semesters by continuing as a directed reading. (3)

3011-3012.Advanced Conversation - Conversation based upon texts, videos, and Web-based sources. Analysis of cultural and some literary texts. Emphasis upon modern films and journalistic writings. Prerequisites: FREN 2010-2020 or permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3-3)

3021. Readings in Francophone Culture - A reading course designed to build advanced-level skills in comprehension of the text. Readings are taken from throughout the Francophone world. Prerequisites: FREN 2010-2020. (3)

3120.Survey of Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century French Literature - This course is a survey of works by significant authors of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in France, with emphasis upon the theatre in the seventeenth century and the Enlightenment philosophes of the eighteenth. Through viewing of films and dramatization in class and from on-line audio sources as well as through more traditional classroom discussions, students will discern the main themes and genres of the best-known works of the two centuries and will situate them in their historical and cultural backgrounds. (3)

4031-4041, 4032-4042, 4033-4043.Directed Readings in French - Readings in an area of French literature mutually agreed upon by teacher and student which is not covered by a current course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chairperson. (1-1, 2-2, 3-3)

4050.Internship - Placement in a supervised work or research situation using French. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson. (3)

4051-4052.Special Topics in French - Critical analysis and exploration of language, culture, or literature. Topics vary according to the needs and interests of department faculty and majors. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of credit. Prerequisites: 6 hours of French beyond French 2020, a rating of Intermediate High on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Interview, or permission of the instructor. (3-3)

4053.(LANG 4053, SPAN 4053)Introduction to Literary Criticism of Spanish, Hispanic, American, French, and Francophone Literature - This course is a capstone course designed for the upper-level students majoring in either French or Spanish. Through readings of both critical texts and literary works, students develop a comprehension of the relationships among history, culture, ideology, and literary production. Students read the literary works under study in their target languages. Discussion is in English in order to accommodate majors from both languages. (3)

4080.(LANG 4080, SPAN 4080)Foreign Language Teaching Methodology - An examination of conventional methodologies of teaching foreign languages. This presentation will be directed to both primary and secondary levels and will include the following topics, among others: analysis of the theoretical premises upon which each method is founded; critical assessment of the strengths and limitations of each method; demonstration of classroom techniques derived from the various methods; discussion of the proficiency orientation contained in each method; and analysis of current textbooks and materials with discussion of how they reflect the theories under study. The practical component of the course will be integrated through demonstrations of teaching techniques, peer teaching, class observations, and hands-on activities. (3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

1010.World Geography - A survey of patterns found in the natural environment, an examination of human and cultural distribution and their spatial interaction on a global scale. (3)

2010.Physical Geography - Physical, soil, vegetation and climatic regions are outlined along with the processes that produce them. (3)

3010.A Regional Geography of the World - A survey of the geographical characteristics and major problems of each of the continents. Attention is given to important individual countries and to groups of countries within each world region and the major challenges facing the world. (3)

3020. Louisiana and Its Resources - A comprehensive study of Louisiana's natural and cultural elements and regions. An observation of man’s role with regard to nature and the future of Louisiana. (May replace HIST 3040 for Elementary Education Certification.) (3)

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GERMAN (GERM)

1010-1020.Elementary German - Grammar, basic vocabulary, simple conversation, reading, and writing. (3-3)

2010-2020.Intermediate German - Review of grammar and further development of language skills. Emphasis on the reading of scientific literature. (3-3)

4031-4041, 4032-4042, 4033-4043.Directed Readings in German - Readings in an area of German literature mutually agreed upon by teacher and student which is not covered by a current course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chairperson. (1-1, 2-2, 3-3)

4050.Internship - Placement in a supervised work or research situation using German. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson. (3)

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HISTORY (HIST)

1030.World Civilizations to 1500 - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Survey of major civilizations of ancient world. Transition to Middle Ages in Africa, Asia, and Europe. (3)

1031H. World Civilizations to 1500 - Usually offered fall semester. Survey ofmajor civilizations of ancient world. Transition to Middle Ages in Africa, Asia, and Europe. For selected honors students. (3)

1040.World Civilizations Since 1500 - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Survey of major world civilizations from 1500 to post-war world. Emphasis on development of modern state system, rise of Western dominance and emergence of Third World nations. (3)

1041H. World Civilizations Since 1500 - Usually offered spring semester. Survey of major world civilizations from 1500 to post-war world. Emphasis on development of modern state system, rise of Western dominance and emergence of Third World nations. For selected honors students. (3)

2010.The United States to 1865 - Explores the interaction and development of American society. Economic, political, religious, and cultural institutions from colonial beginnings to Civil War. Examines colonial resistance, revolution, territorial expansion, economic growth, sectionalism, slavery, and the coming of the Civil War. (3)

2020.The United States Since 1865 - Explores development of American society, economy, politics, culture, and diplomacy from Reconstruction to present. Examines Reconstruction, industrialization, imperialism, wars, civil rights movement, and American involvement in the international world. (3)

2050. Survey Topics in History - Survey of a topic or historical period of special interest. (3)

2200.(THEO 2200) Religion and Southern Culture - Examines the historical interaction between religion and culture in the American South from the colonial period to the present, with particular emphasis upon the African American experience. Prerequisite: One 1000-level Theology course. (3)

2250.(THEO 2250) Religions of the Ancient Near East - Examines religion in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria, and Israel/Canaan through reading ancient Near Eastern religious texts, viewing religious iconography, and examining religious architecture and cultic implements. The course will explore these ancient societies’ answers to such questions as the nature of the divine, the relationship between the divine and humans (including all classes of society), creation, problems of theodicy, and their notions of afterlife. Prerequisite: One 1000-level Theology course. (3)

2415.Introduction to Historical Research and Writing - Usually offered in the fall semester. Introduction to methods, techniques and concepts used by historians. Main emphasis on methods of historical research and analysis, problems confronting historians in dealing with evidence, interpretation, and theory in various chronological and geographic settings. Readings, discussion and research paper using primary sources are required. Prerequisites: HIST 1030, 1040, and ENGL 1020. (3)

3000.Special Topics in History - Topics selected for special interests of students. (3)

3001.History of American Law - This course acquaints students with the historical context of the origins of American law, its evolution, and its application to human relationships and societal interactions. In particular, attempts will be made to analyze the pattern of American constitutional development and its relevance to the composition of our socio-economic and political structure. (3)

3010.Women in International Contexts - A comparative exploration of women’s history during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The course focuses in the similarities and differences between the experiences of women in different parts of the world, with a particular emphasis on personal narratives. (3)

3011 Twentieth Century European History - Focuses on major developments in twentieth century European history, including social, and political history, World War I, Russian Revolution, rise of totalitarian dictatorships, World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, collapse of Communism and rise of the European Community. Prerequisite: HIST 1040. (3)

3020 History Internship - Hands on experience at an historical facility or with departmental oral history or research projects. Requires one hundred hours of work under supervision, a record of work experiences and a written analysis of the overall internship. Grades are on pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: HIST 1030, 1040, successful completion of the computer competency exam and demonstrated typing competency for oral history interns. (3)

3040.History of Louisiana - Examines and interprets the Latin colonial roots of Louisiana, the challenge of Louisiana for the young Republic of the U.S., immigration and the antebellum experience, the crises of the Civil War and Reconstruction, impact of Longism, the petrochemical revolution and contemporary Louisiana. (3)

3050.(AFAM 3050) Gandhi and King: Nonviolent Philosophy of Conflict Resolution - This course examines the similarities and differences between Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. -- their leadership styles, personality traits, philosophical assumptions, the movements they led, and their tactics in particular campaigns. (3)

3350.(AFAM 3350) African American History I - Chronological and in-depth study of specific issues affecting African Americans from their West African beginnings to Civil War. Major themes to be announced each semester. (3)

3360.(AFAM 3360)African American History II - Continuation of topical survey of main currents in African American life from the Civil War to the present. Major themes to be announced each semester. (3)

3370.Civil War and Reconstruction - Deals with the crises and complexities involved in the Civil War and Reconstruction. Explores background of the war and issues of the post-war era. Also examines consensus and conflict over reunion and reconstruction. (3)

3380. United States History Since 1945 - Examines U.S. history from the end of World War II to the present. Emphasis is placed on politics, foreign policy, the modern civil rights movement, and the primary social and cultural events of the period.Prerequisite: HIST 1040. (3)

3385. The Civil Rights Movement in the United States - Examines the major civil rights campaigns that took place throughout the U.S. from 1950 to1975. Focuses on strategies, objectives, successes and failures of civil rights leaders and organizations. Special emphasis on civil rights protests and movements in New Orleans and throughout Louisiana. (3)

3390. African American Women’s History - Examines the unique historical experiences of women of African descent in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Focuses on black women’s contributions to American society and the impact of race, class and gender issues on the experiences of African American women. (3)

3670. History of Africa - Introduction to major themes, narratives, geographies and chronologies of African history from its earliest period to the present, and the ways this history has been recorded by Africans and non-Africans. Topics vary from term to term, with an emphasis on the skills of historical thinking, analysis of evidence and critical thinking and writing. (3)

3675. The Black Atlantic World - Links together the histories of Africa, Europe, North America and South America by emphasizing the activities of Africans and men and women of the African Diaspora. Topics include: Slavery and the slave trade in Africa and the New World, African and Western religions, Revolutions in the West Indies and Africa, European and American imperialism, Neo-colonialism, and Music and Literature. Prerequisites: History 1030 and HIST 1040. Fulfills the requirement for three hours in Developing World History at the 3000 level for History majors. (3)

4020S. Seminar in the Developing World - In-depth study of a particular region, nation, historical period or topic of the Developing World. (3)

4030S. Seminar in American History - In-depth study of a particular region, nation, historical period or topic in American History. (3)

4040S. Seminar in European History - In-depth study of a particular region, nation, historical period or topic in European History. (3)

4150. Ancient Mediterranean - Explores the main historical developments of Mediterranean civilizations from their origins in the Bronze Age (ca. 2000 B.C.) through the decline of imperial Rome (ca. 400). Considers the mutual influence of civilizations of the Mediterranean littoral, cultural and political developments of Greece and Rome, and the rise of Christianity. Prerequisite: HIST 1030. (3)

4170. Medieval Europe to 13 th Century - Focused study of selected historical themes from late antiquity to the high Middle Ages. Topics include the evolving synthesis of Germanic, Christian, and late Roman cultures; ethnogenesis in Europe from the fifth through the tenth centuries; the cult of the saints in the early Middle Ages; the ideology of sacral kingship; church reform, the Investiture Controversy, and the medieval papacy; Jews in medieval Europe; and the transformation of the medieval state from a network of personal ties to a system of government rooted in royal bureaucracy and administration. Prerequisite: HIST 1030. (3)

4420S. World Wars and Dictatorships in European History Seminar - Causes and consequences of World War I. The inter-war years. Rise of communist and fascist dictatorships. World War II. Prerequisite: HIST 1040. (3)

4430S. Revolutions in Modern History - A study of major revolutions which have shaped the modern world. Causes, intellectual foundations, and consequences. Selected from among American, French, Russian, Chinese and Latin American Revolutions. Prerequisite: HIST 1040. (3)

4415S. Seminar in Historical Research - A practical introduction to investigative training in historical research and historiography. Emphasis is placed on such research techniques and principles as topic selection and location, analysis, and verification of data. A substantial research project is required. (3)

4501, 4502, 4503.Directed Readings in History - Readings in an area of history mutually agreed upon by instructor and student which is not covered by a current course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and department chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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HONORS (HNRS)

ENGL 1023H.Introduction to Literature for Honors Students - A study of writing and literary genre for selected students who will take one English 3000-level course rather than ENGL 1010. (3)

ENGL 2011H.Introduction to World Literature - A critical examination of masterpieces of Western and non-Western literature for selected students. (3)

ENGL 4000H.Directed Studies - Concentrated study of major figures and ideas in a selected period. Open to selected students only. (3)

1031H. World Civilizations to 1500 - Usually offered fall semester. Survey ofmajor civilizations of ancient world. Transition to Middle Ages in Africa, Asia, and Europe. For selected honors students. (3)

1041H. World Civilizations Since 1500 - Usually offered spring semester. Survey of major world civilizations from 1500 to post-war world. Emphasis on development of modern state system, rise of Western dominance and emergence of Third World nations. For selected honors students. (3)

MATH 1070H.Introductory Calculus - Usually offered fall semester. Open to selected students only. Students must complete all work in MATH 1070 concurrently and participate in 10 additional meetings in the semester. Prerequisite: Grade of "A" in MATH 1030 or advanced placement by test score or permission of chairperson. (4)

MATH 2070H.Calculus II - Usually offered spring semester. Open to selected students only. Students must complete all work in MATH 1070 concurrently and participate in 10 additional meetings in the semester. Prerequisite: Grade of "A" in MATH 1070 or advanced placement by test score or permission of chairperson. (4)

CMST 1011H.Fundamentals of Public Speaking - This course is a performance-based honors course that requires students to present several speeches. Major emphases are placed on preparation, organization, delivery, and the development of confidence and pride. Students will also participate in a service learning project within the New Orleans community. Prerequisite: Placement by test score, high school GPA, and previous coursework or permission of chairperson and eligible for ENGL 1010. (3)

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INTEGRATED PHYSICAL SCIENCE (IPSC)

2010.Integrated Physical Science - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to the basic concepts and principles of physics, chemistry, and atomic structure. Includes one laboratory session per week. (4)

2020.Earth Science - Usually offered spring semester. Survey of sciences related to our planet dealing with principles of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and environmental sciences. Includes one laboratory session per week. (3)

4010.Advanced Earth Science - Follows guidelines specified by the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program to obtain certification to teach the GLOBE Program, which is a hands-on, experiential science program for grades K-12. Contents of the GLOBE Program will be related to the National Science Standards and the State Science Benchmarks. Four major areas are covered: atmosphere/climate, hydrology, soils, and land cover/biology. Prerequisites for Elementary Education majors: IPSC 2010 and IPSC 2020. (3)

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JAPANESE (JAPN)

 1010-1020.Elementary Japanese - Grammar, basic vocabulary, simple conversation, reading, and writing. (3-3)

 4050.Internship - Placement in a supervised work or research situation involving Japanese. Permission of department chair. (3)

LANGUAGE (LANG)

4053. (FREN 4053, SPAN 4053)Introduction to Literary Criticism of Spanish, Hispanic, American, French, and Francophone Literature - This course is a capstone course designed for the upper-level students majoring in either French or Spanish. Through readings of both critical texts and literary works, students develop a comprehension of the relationships among history, culture, ideology, and literary production. Students read the literary works under study in their target languages. Discussion is in English in order to accommodate majors from both languages. (3)

4080.(FREN 4080, SPAN 4080)Foreign Language Teaching Methodology - An examination of conventional methodologies of teaching foreign languages. This presentation will be directed to both primary and secondary levels and will include the following topics, among others: analysis of the theoretical premises upon which each method is founded; critical assessment of the strengths and limitations of each method; demonstration of classroom techniques derived from the various methods; discussion of the proficiency orientation contained in each method; and analysis of current textbooks and materials with discussion of how they reflect the theories under study. The practical component of the course will be integrated through demonstrations of teaching techniques, peer teaching, class observations, and hands-on activities. (3)

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LATIN (LATN)

1010-1020.Elementary Latin - Grammar, basic vocabulary, graded readings. (3-3)

2010-2020.Intermediate Latin - Review of grammar and additional reading. Selections from ancient authors. (3-3)

MANAGEMENT (MGT)

2060. Principles of Management - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An integrated overview of the fundamentals of managerial decision making with a focus on developing the skills necessary to identify problems that confront managers who then must apply the necessary tools (both analytical and intuitive) to foment solutions that coalesce with the firm’s goals and objectives. Topics include the importance of teamwork, motivation, leadership, and ethics. Prerequisite: ENGL 1020. (3)

3090. (SMKT 3090) Customer Relationship Management - Usually offered spring semester. The course will help students identify actions that businesses use to categorize and address customers effectively through the use of information and technology. This will also help students learn the benefits of knowing customers more intimately and show them how information can be used to increase revenues, satisfaction, and profitability. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050. (3)

3120. Human Resource Management - Usually offered fall semester. Analyzes the "people" problems of management, job analysis, planning, recruiting, selection, training and development, performance evaluation, wage and salary administration, incentive systems, benefit programs. Prerequisite: MGT 2060. (3)

3140. Organizational Behavior - Usually offered fall semester. An experiential approach to learning individual and group behaviors within organizational contexts. Includes both traditional and cutting-edge approaches to behavior in post-modern organizations. Prerequisite: MGT 2060. (3)

3160. Project Management– Usually offered spring semester. The course is organized around teaching the technical aspect of project management, rather than focusing on the theoretical aspects of management. This course will have an enhanced focus on the use of project management application software and a focus on finding “real-world” project on which students can gain hands-on experience. Topics covered will include project planning, budgeting, scheduling, monitoring, and controlling. Prerequisites: MGT 2060 and ECON 2070. (3)

3170. Service Operations Management – Usually offered spring semester. The service sector has become the fastest growing industry sector, on a global basis. Some of the topics covered in the course are yield management, data envelopment analysis, experience management, and scoring systems that are used nearly exclusively in services. This course is intended to focus on these areas and to assist in skill/application building for students pursuing careers in the service sector. Prerequisites: MGT 2060 and ECON 2070. (3)

3190. Operations Management - Usually offered fall semester. A study of the problems encountered in operations and production with emphasis on product decisions, process planning, network planning, plant location, facilities acquisition and layout. Prerequisite: MGT 2060 and BSAD 3055. (3)

3530. (SMKT 3530) Sales Force Management - Organization, communications process, group influences, forecasting, recruiting, training, design, motivation, supervision, compensation, control of sales organizations. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050 (3)

3780. (ENTR 3780) Organization and Operation of a Small Business - An examination of methods that investigate the complexity of management practices in general entrepreneurship with a perspective that can explore the marketplace for successful venture opportunities. Strong emphasis is given to learning the skill factors related to planning, marketing, managing, and financing small business ventures. A two- to five-member team working with a local area entrepreneurial client will develop a comprehensive consulting report including a full business plan. Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors only or permission of the instructor. (3)

4010S. Leadership Seminar – Usually offered spring semester. One of the key aspects of management is its focus on leadership. For centuries the concept of whether leaders are “born or made” has been a subject of debate. Students will be required to read between three to five current books on key management topics and they will be required to analyze the leadership concepts and impacts on the leader’s organization. Additionally, student will be required to read and analyze specific cases in leadership and to conduct a research term paper on a key topic in this area. Prerequisites: senior standing. (3)

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MASS COMMUNICATION (MSCM)

1100. Introduction to Mass Communication - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Examination of the structure, functions, and theories of mass media in contemporary society. Students are familiarized with the social, economic, and political aspects of the radio, television, book, newspaper, public relations, magazine, film, and record industries. (3)

1200. Principles of Visual Media - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Students learn how to tell stories through the basic principles of still photography, video and audio production, print design, graphics, and layout. (3)

2007, 3007, 4007. Public Relations Practicum - Students will gain hands-on public relations experience by working on the departmental newsletter, The Communicator, or other appropriate publication or public relations campaign, such as for a non-profit organization or community group. (Note: Not more that 3 hours of newspaper/broadcast/public relations practicum may be taken.) Prerequisite: MSCM 2222. (1, 1, 1)

2008, 3008, 4008. Newspaper Practicum - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Students will gain hands-on journalism experience by completing stories for the Xavier Herald. Permission of the instructor is required for enrolling in this course. (Note: Not more that 3 hours of newspaper/broadcast/public relations practicum may be taken.) Prerequisite: MSCM 2222. (1, 1, 1)

2009, 3009, 4009. Broadcast Practicum - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A course for students working on the production of student television programs for air on XTV. Students will get practical experience to reinforce classroom learning while serving on the crew or as hosts, writers, producers, or directors for these university programs. (Note: Not more that 3 hours of newspaper/broadcast/public relations practicum may be taken.) Prerequisite: MSCM 1200. (1, 1, 1)

2030. Principles of Public Relations - Examination of the theory of public relations and its relationship to work in the field as practiced by professionals. The course will provide students with a solid foundation in the practice of public relations. (3)

2222. Writing for the Print Media - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Basic writing, rewriting, and editing of newspaper stories. Processes and procedures of information gathering including interviewing and investigative techniques. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 and 1020. (3)

2500. Writing for Radio and Television - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Basic script-writing from commercials to news and drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 and 1020. (3)

2530. Fundamentals of Audio Production - Orientation to capabilities and use of radio studio. Introduction to production of radio program type. Introduction to basic acoustics, radio board operation, commercial and dramatic production. (3)

2580. Appreciation and History of Film - Film as art, industry and as social and cultural force. Emphasis on aesthetic appreciation, major historical developments, and impact of film on American culture. Course includes screening and analysis of several films. Meets core curriculum requirement for Fine Arts. (3)

2950. Radio and Television Announcing - Theory and practice in on-air presence and in the use of the microphone with specific attention toward developing individual abilities in the announcing roles used in the electronic media. Scripted and unscripted delivery in a variety of broadcast situations will be emphasized. (3)

3060. Writing for Public Relations - Comprehensive survey of writing techniques for public relations and public affairs assignments: news releases, brochures, speeches, visual presentations, company publications, public relations and advertising copy writing and public service radio and television spots. Prerequisite: MSCM 2222 and MSCM 2030. (3)

3101. Media Management - Usually offered spring semester. Study of the media company (commercial and public broadcasting, newspapers, and magazines) as a business; its management. Includes study of program formats and programming decisions. (3)

3150. News Editing - Editorial functions of the print media; copy editing, headline writing, management of photographs, and general editorial decision making. Prerequisite: MSCM 2222. (3)

3190. Fundamentals of Television Production - Orientation to basic television studio and field production skills including writing, producing, directing, and production crew responsibilities and technical skills. Students learn to blend theory and practice by producing and directing their own television programs. Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: MSCM 2500 or may be taken concurrently with permission of the instructor. (3)

3210. TV News Gathering and Reporting - Usually offered spring semester. Advanced reporting, interviewing, writing, and photography techniques for television news. Prerequisite: MSCM 3190. (3)

3211. Editorial Practicum - This course is for students holding editorial positions on the Xavier Herald. Students will be responsible for writing, editing and all other aspects of production of the Herald. Permission of the instructor is required. (3)

3250. News Reporting - Advanced reporting, interviewing, and writing techniques for the print media. Prerequisites: MSCM 2222. (3)

3400. Desktop Publishing - Computer layout and design for newspapers, brochures, newsletters and other publications pertaining to print journalism and public relations using QuarkXPress and PhotoShop. Students will work on practical projects, such as the students newspaper, a departmental newsletter and/or a business/organization media kit. Prerequisites: MSCM 1200. (3)

3500. Media Criticism - Development and application of criteria for evaluating media products. Critical analysis of specific programs and articles. Students will present both oral and written critiques of media content and techniques. (3)

3600. Introduction to Mass Communication Research - Treatment of mass communica-tion theory and processes in quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Course includes analysis of complete research projects. Students are provided the opportunity to design and complete basic research projects. (3)

3650. Advanced Topics in Production - Hands-on experience as part of a professional team. Course aids in the development of practical skills important in print or non-print media. Topic to be determined by instructor. Prerequisites: MSCM 2222 or MSCM 2500 and permission of the instructor. (3)

3831. History of American Mass Media - Usually offered fall semester. Survey of cultural history of journalism from pre-colonial times to the present. Special examination of Black journalism history and impact of electronic technologies. (3)

4000. Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines - Interviewing, reporting, and writing skills for writing newspaper and magazine feature stories. Prerequisite: MSCM 2222. (3)


4010. Producing Television Newscasts
- Through hands-on experience, students learn to write, format and produce television newscasts. Students are expected to make critical decisions regarding newscast content, treatment and journalistic integrity while creating highly attractive and promotable newscasts under deadline. Prerequisites: MSCM 2500, 3210, and 3190, but MSCM 3210 may be taken concurrently with permission of the instructor. (3)

4020. TV Program Production - Through practical exercises and hands-on experience, students learn the process of producing fictional television programs. Students are expected to take a one-half-hour television program idea (sitcom, drama, soap opera) from concept to final shooting schedule. This class emphasizes the business, management and marketing aspects of producing television programs as well as advanced production techniques required of fictional television both on location and in the studio. Prerequisites: MSCM 2500, 3210, and 3190, but MSCM 3210 may be taken concurrently with permission of the instructor. (3)

4060. Public Relations Campaigns - Study of cases in public relations. Features an in-depth workplace style experience in research, production, application and evaluation of a campaign. Prepares upper level students for professional collaborative working in agencies or organizations. Prerequisites: MSCM 2222, 2030, and 3060. (3)

4131, 4132, 4133. Independent Study - Opportunity for in-depth study or research in an area of interest in mass communications. Area of study to be determined by student in consultation with supervising instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (1, 2, 3)

4200. Integrated Communications for Public Relations - The distinction between public relations, marketing and advertising are converging into the growing emphasis of integrated communications. Integrated Communications in Public Relations (ICPR) is a strategy employed by communications professionals to coordinate and combine messages in order to maximize their impact and promote products, causes or ideas. This course offers an exploratory introduction into integrated communications, highlighting the core disciplines of public relations, advertising, and marketing. The ICPR model is based in the strategic management of organizational communication and promotional opportunities. Prerequisites: MSCM 2222, MSCM 2030, and permission of the instructor. (3)

4400. Environmental Communications - Explores contemporary ecological issues and approaches. Stress on in-depth research and reporting on local environmental problems. (3)

4410. Internship - Usually offered fall and spring semesters, and summer. Hands-on experience provided to students at a communications facility. Professional training experience furnished in media organization, operation, and team effort. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status with minimum of 18 hours of MSCM courses or permission of instructor. (3)

4430. Media Law and Ethics - Review of landmark cases in media law, especially First Amendment issues. Case studies of ethical theory and problems in communication practice. (3)

4520. Seminar in Mass Communication - In-depth study through lecture, discussion, and research of an individual problem or issue in the field of mass communication. Specific subject matter will be chosen by instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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MATHEMATICS (MATH)

0960D.Pre-Algebra Review - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Review of single operations on integers, fractions and decimals; exponentials; simple factorizations; linear equations; geometric problems involving area and perimeter of basic figures. This course may be required for those students whose math score on the SAT or ACT or the Xavier Mathematics Placement Test is below the acceptable level. Upon completion, the student must enroll in and MATH 0981D. (Non-Degree Credit) (3)

0981D.Algebra Review - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Review of high school algebra. Operations with algebraic expressions and fractions; factoring; exponentials and radicals; solving equations and inequalities; graphing; basic analytic geometry. This courses may be required for those students whose math score on the SAT or ACT or the Xavier Mathematics Placement Test is below the acceptable level. Also, students placed in MATH 0960D must complete that course before entering this course. (Non-Degree Credit) (4)

1010. Principles of Modern Mathematics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Survey of mathematics: topics in college algebra for non-technical majors. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics deficiencies. (3)

1015. College Algebra for Elementary Education Majors - Usually offered every semester. Algebra of elementary functions and relations to their graphs. Applications and the use of technology are incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics deficiencies. (3)

1020.*(STAT 2010- Statistical Methods I) Basic Statistics I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Descriptive statistics, probability and statistical inference. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics deficiencies. (3

*Students may not receive credit for both MATH 2010 ( STAT 1020) and ECON 2070

1030.Pre-Calculus - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Unified college algebra and trigonometry. Elementary functions and relations with their graphs. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics deficiencies. (4)

1070.Introductory Calculus - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. The derivative and integral with their principal interpretations and interrelationships; simple techniques of differentiation and integration; numerical integration; applications of differentiation and integration. The use of technology is integrated in this course. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in MATH 1030 or advanced placement by test score or permission of chairperson. (4)

1070H.Introductory Calculus - Usually offered fall semester. Open to selected students only. Students must complete all work in MATH 1070 concurrently and participate in 10 additional meetings in the semester. Prerequisite: Grade of "A" in MATH 1030 or advanced placement by test score or permission of chairperson. (4)

2015.Geometry for Elementary Education Majors - Understanding and applying geometric relationships and problem solving in two and three dimensions. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1015. (3)

2025.Finite Mathematics for Elementary Education Majors - Elementary sets and operations, introduction to combinatorics, elementary graph theory, solving systems of linear equations, introduction to matrices, linear programming, and applications. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1015. (3)

2030.Elementary Linear Algebra - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues, linear mappings, etc. Corequisite: MATH 1070. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1030. (3)

2040.(STAT 2020)Statistical Methods II) Basic Statistics II - Usually offered spring semester. Hypothesis testing of population means, proportions, etc. Contingency tables, goodness-of-fit, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics. Introduction of computer packages to analyze data. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1020 (or STAT 2010) or ECON 2070. (3)

2070.Calculus II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Continuation of techniques of integration; applications; improper integrals; infinite series. Topics in analytic geometry; polar coordinates and parametric equations. The use of technology is integrated in this course. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in MATH 1070. (4)

2070H.Calculus II - Usually offered spring semester. Open to selected students only. Students must complete all work in MATH 2070 concurrently and participate in 10 additional meetings in the semester. Prerequisite: Grade of "A" in MATH 1070 or advanced placement by test score or permission of chairperson. (4)

2080.Calculus III - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Geometry of three dimensions; real-valued functions of several variables; partial differentiation; multiple integration. Vector analysis; line integrals and surface integrals. The use of technology is integrated in this course. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in MATH 2070. (4)

2150L.(STAT 2150L)Statistics Technology Lab - Usually offered spring semester. Problem-solving in statistics using appropriate statistical software. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in STAT 2010 (MATH 1020) or ECON 2070. (1)

2160L.Mathematics Technology Lab - Usually offered spring semester. Solution of complex mathematical problems using appropriate computer software. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1070 (1)

2530.Differential Equations - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Usual methods of solving ordinary differential equations; introduction to the general theory. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2070. (3)

2550.Discrete Structures for Computer Science and Mathematics I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Topics in combinatorics and graph theory; permutations and combinations, graphs and trees, recurrence relations, applications of combinatorics to discrete probability. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in PHIL 2040 and MATH 1070. (3)

2560.Discrete Structures for Computer Science and Mathematics II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Foundational topics of mathematical structures with applications in computer science: logical foundations and induction, sets, relations, recurrence relations, functions, introduction to algebraic structures. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2550. (3)

3010.(STAT 3010)Biostatistics - Applications of descriptive and inferential statistics to health science disciplines. Introduction of specialized techniques used in biomedical sciences. Prerequisites: Grade “C” or better in STAT 2020 or MATH 2040 or ECON 2070 or permission of the instructor. (3)

3040.(CPSC 3040) Numerical Analysis - Methods of numerical computation. Error analysis, solutions of equations, interpolation and polynomial approximation, least squares approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution to differential equations.. Corequisite: MATH 2530. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2080 and working knowledge of some programming language (3)

3051.(STAT 3051)Mathematical Probability and Statistics I - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to concepts of probability and random variables. Discrete and continuous distributions with applications. Algebra of expectations. Covariance and correlation of two random variables. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in MATH 2550 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: MATH 2080. (3)

3061.(STAT 3061)Mathematical Probability and Statistics II - Usually offered spring semester. Purpose and nature of sampling, particularly from normal populations. Chi-square, t, and F distributions. Formulating and testing statistical hypotheses, point and interval estimation. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 3051 (or STAT 3051). (3)

3110.Applied Mathematics - Usually offered spring semester. Applications of different topics in mathematics with emphasis on modeling techniques. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2030 or permission of the instructor. (3)

3750.Complex Variables and Applications - Usually offered every other spring semester. Theory and application of complex numbers, complex mappings, analytic and holomorphic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 2080 with a grade of "C" or better. (3)

4001.Mathematical Problem Solving I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Helps students develop strategies and abilities for solving complex mathematical problems. Focus is on problems not covered in ordinary course work from a variety of areas in mathematics with emphasis on differential and integral calculus, differential equations, and their applications. Places strong emphasis on critical reasoning, synthesis, and clarity of written expressions. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in each of MATH 2080 and MATH 2530. (1)

4002.Mathematical Problem Solving II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Helps students develop strategies and abilities for solving complex mathematical problems. Focus is on problems not covered in ordinary course work from a variety of areas in mathematics with emphasis on discrete mathematics, linear algebra, abstract algebra, and their applications. Places strong emphasis on critical reasoning, synthesis, and clarity of written expressions. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2030, MATH 2550 and MATH 2560. (1)

4010.Modern Geometry - Elementary foundations of geometry from a rigorous point of view, concepts in advanced Euclidean, projective, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2070 and MATH 2560 or permission of instructor. (3)

4030.History of Mathematics - A general survey of the main trends in the development of mathematics from ancient times to the present. The cultural and social contexts of mathematical activity will be studied along with the classic problems. Intensive reading required. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2080 and MATH 4010. (3)

4050.Advanced Calculus I - Usually offered fall semester. Real number system; Sequences -- their limit, Bolzano-Weistrass Theorem; Limits of functions; Continuous functions, uniform continuity. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2080 and MATH 2560 or permission of instructor. (3)

4060.Advanced Calculus II - Usually offered spring semester. Differentiation, Riemann-Stieltjes integration; Sequences of functions -- uniform convergence, Infinite series. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 4050 or permission of instructor. (3)

4070.Introduction to Topology - Usually offered every other spring semester. Topology of the line and plane; abstract topological spaces; continuous functions on topological spaces; metric and normed spaces; separation axioms; compactness; product spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 4050 with a grade of "C" or better or permission of the instructor. (3)

4095/4095D.Abstract Algebra/Abstract Algebra Drill - A study of algebraic structures, focusing on groups and rings, including normal subgroups, quotient groups, permutation groups, cyclic groups, quotient rings, integral domains, elementary ideal theory and homomorphisms. Introduction to field theory. MATH 4095 has three lectures per week and MATH 4095D meets once per week. Prerequisites: MATH 2560 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: MATH 4095D. (3/0)

4201, 4202, 4203.Special Topics - Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (1, 2, 3)

4511-4521.(STAT 4511-4521) Colloquium - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Topic determined each semester by faculty. Independent work by students under the guidance of a faculty member to be presented orally and in writing to student majors and faculty. Meets once per week. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in all MATH or STAT required courses at the 2000-level and junior or senior status. 4511 is prerequisite to 4521. (1-1)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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MILITARY SCIENCE (MLSC)

General Military Courses

1011.Leadership and Professional Development - Introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. (2)

1021.Introduction to Tactical Leadership - Usually offered spring semester. Overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on and interactive exercises. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the cadets through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MSL 102 experience. Prerequisite: MLSC 1011 or permission of department chairperson. (2)

2010.Innovative Team Leadership - Usually offered fall semester. Explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army Leadership Framework. Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Solder’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Prerequisite: MLSC 1021 or permission of the department chairperson. (2)

2021.Management Techniques - Usually offered spring semester. Examines the challenges of leading teams in the COE. The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MSL 202 provides a smooth transition into MSL 301. Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios. Prerequisite: MLSC 2010 or permission of the department chairperson. (2)

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Professional Officer Courses

3010.Adaptive Team Leadership - Usually offered fall semester. A course through which cadets study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Specific feedback is given on leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, cadets continue to develop critical thinking and tactical leadership abilities in preparation for ROTC’s Leadership and Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Prerequisite: MLSC 2021 or permission of the department chairperson. (3)

3020.Leadership Under Fire - Usually offered spring semester. Intense situational leadership challenges are offered to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members when “under fire” are evaluated and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed in preparation for the ROTC Leadership and Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop-leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operation orders. Prerequisite: MLSC 3010 or permission of the department chairperson. (3)

4010.Developing Adaptive Leaders - Usually offered fall semester. Course develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as member of staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel procedures prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers. Cadets identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates. Prerequisite: MLSC 3020 or permission of the department chairperson. (2)

4020.Professionalism of Leadership - Usually offered spring semester. Course explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations. Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with nongovernmental organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first assignment. Prerequisite: MLSC 4010 or permission of the department chairperson. (2)

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MUSIC (MURE, MUAP, MUEN, MUME, MUSH, MUSM, MUST)

Private InstructionApplied Music (MUAP)

Students should confer with the Music Department chairman on registration day for assignment to an instructor. In so far as possible, the student's choice of a teacher will be respected. (Courses carry instrument suffix.)

1834xx-1844xx Private music instruction.
2834xx-2844xx Two one-hour lessons and a minimum of 20 hours practice per
3834xx-3844xx week. (4-4)
4834xx-4844xx

1733xx-1743xx Private music instruction.
2733xx-2743xx One one-hour lesson and a minimum of 15 hours practice per
3733xx-3743xx week. (3-3)
4733xx-4743xx

1632xx-1642xx Private music instruction.
2632xx-2642xx One one-hour lesson and a minimum of 10 hours practice per
3632xx-3642xx week. (2-2)
4632xx-4642xx

1531xx-1541xx Private music instruction.
2531xx-2541xx One half-hour lesson and a minimum of 6 hours practice per
3531xx-3541xx week. (1-1)
4531xx-4541xx

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Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles (MUEN)

1010U-1020U, 2010U-2020U, 3010U-3020U, 4010U-4020U.University Chorus - Open to all members of the University community, except music majors. No audition necessary, but previous choral experience required. (2 each for non-music majors only)

1310U-1320U, 2310U-2320U, 3310U-3320U, 4310U-4320U.University Chorus - Open to all members of the University community. No audition necessary, but previous choral experience required. (1 each)

1030C-1040C, 2030C-2040C, 3030C-3040C, 4030C-4040C.Concert Choir - Membership limited by audition. Not open to music majors. (2 each for non-music majors only)

1330C-1340C, 2330C-2340C, 3330C-3340C, 4330C-4340C.Concert Choir - Membership limited by audition. (1 each)

1010S-1020S, 2010S-2020S, 3010S-3020S, 4010S-4020S.Symphonic Band - Open to all students of the University community, except music majors. (2 each for non-music majors only)

1910S-1920S, 2910S-2920S, 3910S-3920S, 4910S-4920S.Symphonic Band - Open to all students of the University community. (1 each)

1051J-1061J, 2051J-2061J, 3051J-3061J, 4051J-4061J. Jazz Laboratory Band - Study and performance of modern jazz literature. Not open to music majors. (2 each for non-music majors only)

1951J-1961J, 2951J-2961J, 3951J-3961J, 4951J-4961J.Jazz Laboratory Band - Study and performance of modern jazz literature. (1 each)

1351O, 1352O, 1353O - 1361O, 1362O, 1363O;
2351O, 2352O, 2353O - 2361O, 2362O, 2363O;
3351O, 3352O, 3353O - 3361O, 3362O, 3363O;
4351O, 4352O, 4353O - 4361O, 4362O, 4363O.Opera Workshop - Staged productions of operas and operatic scenes.(1, 2, 3 - 1, 2, 3)

1370C-1380C, 2370C-2380C, 3370C-3380C, 4370C-4380C.Contemporary Group - Study and performance of a variety of contemporary musical styles. (1 each)


1331xx, 1332xx, 1333xx - 1341xx, 1342xx, 1343xx;
2331xx, 2332xx, 2333xx - 2341xx, 2342xx, 2343xx;
3331xx, 3332xx, 3333xx - 3341xx, 3342xx, 3343xx;

4331xx, 4332xx, 4333xx - 4341xx, 4342xx, 4343xx.Chamber Ensemble - Study and performance of chamber music in various instrumental combinations. (Courses carry instrument suffix.) (1, 2, 3 - 1, 2, 3)

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Music Education (MUME)

2013.Elementary Classroom Music - Study of music fundamentals and the materials and methods of teaching music in the elementary school. Designed for Elementary Education majors. (3)

3021A-3022B. Music in the Junior-Senior High School - Same course description as EDUC 3020A-B.

4061T/4061S. Student Teaching in Music/Seminar in Student Teaching in Music See EDSC 4061/4061S. (9/0)

Music History (MUSH )

1050.Introduction to Music History and Literature I - An overview of the fundamentals of the history and literature of music from the Medieval through the Baroque Periods. This course will emphasize listening and is designed for music majors. (3)

1070.Introduction to Music History and Literature II - An overview of the fundamentals in the history and literature of music from 18 th century Classicism through the New Music of the 20 th century. This course will emphasize listening and is designed for music majors. (3)

2000.Music Appreciation - General study in the history and literature of music designed for the non-music major. (3)

2050.Music History I - Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance music. Pre-requisite: MUSH 1050. (3)

2060.Music History II - Music of the Baroque era. Prerequisite: MUSH 1050. (3)

2130-2140. Afro-American Music - Music of the African American. (3-3)

3050.Music History III - Classical and Romantic music. Prerequisite: MUSH 1050. (3)

3060.Music History IV - Contemporary music. Music of the 20th century. Prerequisite: MUSH 1050. (3)

Musicianship (MUSM)

1200.Italian Diction - Rules of pronunciation in basic Italian song literature. (1)

1211,1212 - 1221, 1222. Voice Class I – II - Principles of voice production.
(1,2 - 1,2)

2211,2212 - 2221,2222.Voice Class III – IV - More advanced approach to voice production. Prerequisite: MUSM 1211-1221 or private voice study. (1,2 - 1,2)

1270-1280.Piano Class I – II - Fundamental piano techniques. (1-1)

2270-2280.Piano Class III – IV - Continuation of basic piano techniques. Pre-requisite: MUSM 1270-1280 or private piano study. (1-1)

3270-3280.Piano Class V – VI - Advanced techniques of piano study. Pre-requisites: MUSM 2270-2280. (1-1)

2010. Foundations in Functional Musicianship I – Voice and Percussion - A brief overview of the vocal mechanism with its fundamental pedagogy and a selected study of percussion instruments. (1)

  • Foundations in Functional Musicianship II – Woodwinds and Brass - Techniques of woodwind and brass playing and fundamental pedagogy. (1)

3010. Foundations in Functional Musicianship III – Strings and Guitar - Basic techniques of playing stringed instruments and basic fingering and techniques of guitar playing. (1)

4010. Foundations in Functional Musicianship IV – Technology in the Teaching of Music - An introduction to music technology in software and computer programs, audio-visual teaching support technology, Powerpoint, and the use of digital piano/computer lab. (1

2180.Elementary Conducting - Techniques and terminologies for beginning conductors. (2)

3180.Advanced Conducting - Advanced techniques, strategies, and termi­nology for conducting band, orchestra, and chorus; guidance in conducting choral, orchestra, and band rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: MUSM 2180. (2)

  • French Diction - Rules of pronunciation using basic French song literature. (1)

3200.German Diction - Rules for pronunciation using basic German song literature. (1)

4001, 4002, 4003.Directed Readings in Music - (1, 2, 3)

4101, 4102, 4103.Special Topics in Music - Selected studies in the history, literature, performance, or theory of music. (1, 2, 3)

4210-4220.Vocal Pedagogy and Literature I – II - Pedagogical and historical concepts in vocal study, vocal production and vocal literature. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. (2-2)

4250-4260.Major Applied Instrument Pedagogy and Literature I – II - Pedagogical and historical concepts of the major applied instruments, methodologies, and literature. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. (2-2)

4270-4280.Piano Pedagogy and Literature I – II - Pedagogical and historical concepts in piano study, methodologies and literature. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. (2-2)

4999.Senior Comprehensives - Required in last semester of residence for Bachelor of Arts majors. (0)

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Music Theory (MUST)  

1030-1040.Music Theory I – II - Rudiments of music; part-writing techniques; primary, secondary triads and dominant sevenths and inversions. Prerequisite for MUST 1030: entrance examination. MUST 1030 is prerequisite for MUST 1040. (3-3)

1030L-1040L.Music Theory Lab I – II - Emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and dictation. Prerequisite for MUST 1030L: entrance examination or MUST 1000. MUST 1030L is prerequisite for MUST 1040L. (1-1)

2030-2040.Music Theory III – IV - Advanced part-writing; seventh chords, secondary dominants, simple and advanced alterations; modulation; chromatic harmony; 20th century applications. Prerequisite: MUST 1030-1040. MUST 2030 is prerequisite for MUST 2040. (3-3)

2030L-2040L.Music Theory Lab III – IV - Advanced sight-reading, ear-training, and dictation. Prerequisite: MUST 1030L-1040L. MUST 2030L is prerequisite for MUST 2040L. (1-1)

3030.Eighteenth Century Counterpoint - Contrapuntal techniques and stylistic functions found in Baroque forms; practical application to writing in this style. Prerequisites: MUST 1030-1040 and MUST 2030-2040. (2)

3090. Orchestration - Study of and writing for orchestral instruments. Prerequisites: MUST 1030-1040 and 2030-2040. (2)

h
3111-3112.Composition I – II - Study of compositional methods and writing in small forms. Prerequisites: MUST 1030-1040 and MUST 2030-2040. (2-2)

4030-4040.Analytical Techniques I – II - Historical analysis of music from Medieval to Contemporary era. Prerequisites: MUST 1030-1040 and MUST 2030-2040. (2-2)

4500H.Music Theory Honors Seminar - A seminar project under the supervision of a selected faculty person in fulfillment of departmental requirements to graduate with honors in music theory. The students who elects to complete this program must choose one of the following projects: (A) composing an original work of one or two movements, (B) arranging an approved composition, or (C) the formal analysis of an approved composition. (1)

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Music Recitals (MURE)

1070A-1070B, 2070A-2070B, 3070A-3070B, 4070A-4070B.Recital Class - Weekly recitals for performance experiences. Required of all music majors. (0)

3000.Junior Recital - Required during junior year of all performance majors. (0)

4000.Senior Recital - Required during senior year of all performance majors. (0)

PHARMACY
DIVISION OF BASIC PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY (PHCH)

4450-4460. Medicinal Chemistry I and II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters respectively. Chemistry of drugs and related endogenous compounds, structures, classifications, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of actions, physicochemical properties, and metabolism. Prerequisite for both: PHSC 3622. Corequisite for 4450: PHSC 3632L, Prerequisite for 4460: PHSC 3632L. (3-3)

PHARMACOLOGY (PHCL)

3350. Biomedical Immunology - Usually offered in fall semester. Immunology from a biomedical perspective as applied to pharmacy practice. Introduces basic principles of the immune system as an adaptive physiological system. Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Pharmacy. (2)

3450-3460/3450L. (BIOL 3450/3450L-3460) Human Physiology and Anatomy - Comprehensive view of the human body emphasizing individual systems and their interactions with each other and exogenous materials. Limited to Pharmacy students. Prerequisite: BIOL 1240. (3-3/1)

4310. Pathophysiology - Usually offered fall semester. Basic principles of general and systemic disease processes. Emphasis placed on etiology, clinical findings and pathogenesis of selected diseases. Prerequisites: PHSC 4120, PHCL 3450, PHCL 3450L, PHCL 3460, PHCL 3350, PHSC 3640. (4)

4510-4520/4520L.Pharmacology I and II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters respectively. Principles and mechanisms by which chemical agents modulate physiological functions. The laboratory addresses applications of pharmacological concepts. Major topics include basic principles, autonomic, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous system pharmacology, autacoids, immunomodulators, antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Prerequisites: PHSC 4120, PHSC 3622, PHCL 3350, PHSC 3640, Corequisite of 4510: PHCL 4310. Prerequisite for 4520/4520L: PHCL 4310. (4-3/1)

PHARMACEUTICS (PHCT)

4050/4050L.Pharmaceutics I - Usually offered spring semester. Concepts of design, preparation, use, and evaluation of solid, and semi-solid dosage forms. Specific topics include powders, tablets, capsules, coated dosage forms, suspensions, emulsions, magmas, gels, lotions, ointments, creams, pastes, suppositories, transdermal systems, sustained release products, and novel drug delivery systems. Prerequisite: PHCY 3150, Corequisites: PHCY 4050 and 4050L are mutually corequisite. (3/1)

4060. Pharmaceutics II - Usually offered fall semester. Concepts of design, preparation, use, and evaluation of liquid dosage forms. Principles of ionic equilibria, pharmaceutical buffers, colligative properties, chemical kinetics, and solubility product are discussed. Specific topics include oral, nasal ophthalmic, parenteral, topical, aerosol solutions, and products of biotechnology and recombinant DNA. Prerequisite: PHSC 3622, PHCY 3150. (3)

4480. Biopharmaceutics and Basic Pharmacokinetics - Usually offered spring semester. Mathematical descriptions of the complex processes involved in drug release, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. Introduction to the basic pharmacokinetic principles behind the assessment of bioavailability and bioequivalence, drug interactions and calculations of dosage regimens. Prerequisites: PHCT 4050 and PHCT 4060. (3)

PHARMACY (PHCY)For other PHCY courses, see DCAS section.

3150. Pharmaceutical Calculations - Usually offered fall semester. Reviews basic arithmetic skills and discusses fundamental calculations encountered in the practice of pharmacy. Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Pharmacy. (2

4310-4320. Research and Literature Evaluation I and II - Usually offered fall and spring semesters, respectively. Introduction to theory and practice of research methodology and evaluation of literature in biomedical sciences. Topics include protocol development, study designs, sampling techniques, data collection, measurement and analysis, ethical and regulatory considerations as well as techniques for evaluating and summarizing medical literature. Prerequisite: PHCY 4600 and enrollment in College of Pharmacy for two years. PHCY 4310 is a prerequisite to PHCY 4320. (1-1

4430. Basic and Clinical Nutrition - Usually offered spring semester. Information on nutrition in relationship to maintenance or restoration of health and treatment of diseases. Prerequisite: PHSC 4120 and enrollment in College of Pharmacy for one year. (3

4600. Biostatistics - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to basic biostatistical principles and statistical concepts, principles and methods used in designing experiments, analyzing data and drawing inference in biomedical/pharmaceutical sciences. The student shall also be exposed to the use of a statistical software package. Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Pharmacy. (3)

3041. Pharmacy Skills Lab 1 Usually offered spring semester. Experiences designed to assure students are prepared to deal with the technologies and computer systems that permeate the health care environment. (1

  • 4042. Pharmacy Skills Lab 2 – Usually offered fall semester. Experiences designed to prepare the students for clinical practice including physical assessment skills in selected anatomical systems, introduction to interviewing and counseling techniques, and CPR. (1)

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PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES (PHSC)

3640. Molecular Biology and Biotechnology - Usually offered spring semester. Molecular biology concepts applied to pharmacy with emphasis on components, techniques and products of pharmaceutical biotechnology. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Pharmacy and PHSC 4120. (3)

3622. Principles of Drug Action - Usually offered spring semester. Concepts and principles across a range of basic pharmaceutical sciences including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetics. Major topics addressed include physicochemical properties, drug stability, metabolism, pharmacodynamics, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, drug design and radiopharmacy. Prerequisite: PHSC 4120. (2)

3632L. Pharmaceutical Sciences Lab - Usually offered fall semester. Topics include laboratory safety, scientific report preparation, partition coefficients, distribution phenomena, buffers, drug lability, enzyme function, biotechnology and immunology. Prerequisite: PHSC 3622. (1)

4120. (PHSC 4120) Pharmaceutical Biochemistry - Students will be introduced to the structure and function of biomolecules, including their metabolism, synthesis, and degradation. They will learn major biochemical pathways and biochemical energetics. Students who complete the course will be aware of the significance of biochemistry relative to specific clinical problems. They will be cognizant of diseases derived from aberrant biochemical processes and of biochemical solutions based upon an understanding of molecular cellular processes. Prerequisites: CHEM 2220 or equivalent. Limited to Pharmacy students. (3)

PHARMACY

DIVISION OF CLINICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES
CLINICAL PHARMACY (PCLN)

4370. Pharmacy Practice - Usually offered fall semester. Provides an orientation to various areas of contemporary pharmacy practice. Topics include practices in community, institutional, industrial, nuclear, long term care, and clinical pharmacy. Application of knowledge is emphasized. Prerequisites: PHCY 3030-3040, PHCL 4510-4520/4520L, PHAD 4450, PHCT 4050/4050L, and PHCT 4060. Corequisite: PCLN 4370L. (3

4370L. Pharmacy Practice Lab - Usually offered fall semester. Simulation of professional activities associated with community and institutional pharmacy practices. Corequisite: PCLN 4370. (1)

4590. Applied Pharmacokinetics - Usually offered fall semester. Focus on principles of therapeutic drug monitoring and clinical pharmacokinetics of select drugs in different patient populations and disease states. Prerequisites: PHCL 4510, PHCL 4520-4520L, PHCT 4480. (3)

4660-4670-4680. Disease State Management I, II & III - Usually offered spring (I and III), and fall (II) semesters. Information on clinical use of drugs. Focus on assessment and medical management of various disease states, consideration and precautions in selection and dosing of medications, and recognition of significant adverse effects and toxicity of drugs. For 4660 – Prerequisites: PHCL 4310, PHCL 4510 and Corequisite: PHCY 4043. For 4670 – Prerequisites: PCLN 4660, PHCL 4520/4520L and Corequisite: PHCY 4054. For 4680 – Prerequisite: PCLN 4660 and Corequisite: PHCY 4055. (5-5-5)

  • 4660-4670-4680D. Disease State Management I, II, III Drill/Case Studies – Usually offered spring (I and III) and fall (II) semesters. These drill sections are designed to reinforce the lecture series through problem based learning. (0)

4685. Advanced Topics in HIV/AIDS – Usually offered in the spring semester. This elective course is intended to provide a higher-level and more in-depth discussion of areas of contemporary concern and interest in the pharmaceutical care process of HIV/AIDS disease and its complications. Corequisite: PCLN 4680 or approval of instructor. (2)

5002-5003. Community Externships - Usually offered all semesters including summer. Professional experience rotations designed to provide experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care as it relates to community (retail) pharmacy practice. Student, under the direct supervision of a Registered Pharmacist-Preceptor, will be exposed to all of the ethical, legal, professional and managerial functions required of a competent pharmacist in a community-based practice site. Specific activities include: receiving, dispensing and compounding prescriptions; and advising patients on the proper use of prescription and non-prescription medications, products, supplies, and/or devices. Prerequisite: Completion of all first, second and third year pharmacy courses. (4-4)

5102-5103. Institutional Externships - Usually offered all semesters including summer. Practical experience rotations designed to provide experience in the delivery of pharmaceutical care as it relates to hospital and institutional pharmacy services. Under the direct supervision of a Registered Pharmacist-Preceptor, the student will actively participate in drug distribution, intravenous admixture services and institutional practice management. The student will learn how these activities are interrelated and coordinated with other healthcare providers (physicians, nurses, etc.) involved with drug use throughout the institution. Participating hospitals are selected on the basis of their broad range of pharmaceutical services. Prerequisite: Completion of all first, second and third year pharmacy courses. (4-4)

5212-5222-5232-5242-5252-5262. Clinical Clerkships - Usually offered all semesters including summer. Clerkship experience involving direct patient care in monitoring the patient's medications for appropriateness of therapy; activities will also include patient medication counseling and dissemination of drug information to patients and healthcare professionals; involvement in various quality assurance activities for ultimate collaboration among all healthcare team participants to improve the patient's therapeutic outcome. Prerequisite: Completion of all first, second and third year pharmacy courses. (4-4-4-4-4-4)

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PHARMACY ADMINISTRATION (PHAD)

4450. Behavioral Pharmacy and Communications - Usually offered spring semester. Emphasizes improvement of interpersonal communication to enhance patient understanding of therapeutic regimens and achievement of desired health outcomes. The theoretical framework is formed from the patient-centered model of the medication use process. Prerequisites: Enrollment in College of Pharmacy for one academic year, PSYC 1010 or SOCI 1010. Corequisite: PHCY 4043. (2)

4410. Pharmacy Management - Usually offered fall semester. Introduces economic, administrative, and social behavioral aspects associated with the operation of a pharmacy. Major topics include; organizational structure, policy formulation, financial analysis, purchasing and inventory control, personnel management, pricing, and promotion. Prerequisites: ECON 1030, PSYC 1010 or SOCI 1010. Corequisite: PCLN 4370. (3)

4430. Practice Management and Pharmacoeconomics - Usually offered spring semester. Applications of pharmacy management principles to practice settings and introduction to principles of economic outcomes assessment as tools in decision making. Prerequisite: PHAD 4410. (3)

4520. Pharmacy Law - Usually offered spring semester. Study of the Federal Controlled Substance ACT, DEA regulations and Louisiana State Laws. Includes focus on malpractice liability, theory and legal issues: Prerequisite: PCLN 4370/4370L. (2)

  • 4560. Pharmaceutical Marketing – Usually offered spring semester. This elective course is designed to provide exposure to the business side of the pharmaceutical industry from a marketing perspective – specifically, marketing, marketing research, and advertising and promotion. Prerequisite: PHCY 3030. (3)

PHARMACY (PHCY) For other PHCY courses, see DBPS section.

3030. Introduction to Pharmacy I - Usually offered fall semester . Introduction to history of pharmacy, healthcare, epidemiology, preventive medicine, pharmacy laws and regulations, pharmacy careers and applications of technology in pharmacy. Includes basics of pharmacy practice and use of traditional and electronic drug information resources. Prerequisite: Admission to College of Pharmacy. (2)

5500. Seminar - Designed to provide experience in preparation and presentation of pharmacy related topics to professional peers. Seminar topic categories include pharmacy practice, therapeutic issues, and research reports. Prerequisites: PCLN 4660 and PCLN 4670. (1)

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PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

 

Introductory Courses

A STUDENT MAY NOT TAKE MORE THAN ONE OF THESE COURSES TO SATISFY CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS.

1030. Great Books in Philosophy - An introduction to philosophy using the original writings of several philosophers from the classical to the contemporary periods. The intent of this course is to develop the student's capacity for critical reading, writing, and thinking, with a general consideration of the nature, methods, and cultural impact of philosophy. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

1070. Problems in Philosophy - An introduction to philosophy using the fundamental questions of philosophy as well as some of the most outstanding contributions to their solutions, with a general consideration of the nature, methods, and cultural impact of philosophy. This course will develop the student's capacity for critical reading, writing, and thinking. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

THE FOLLOWING COURSES MAY BE TAKEN AS EITHER INTRODUCTORY COURSES OR AS UPPER LEVEL COURSES.

2011. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy - This course introduces the student to western philosophy by focusing on the writings of several philosophers from the ancient and medieval periods, including Plato and Aristotle.  Topics typically covered include the Socratic method of philosophy; the significance of the human soul; teleological approaches to nature; and the role of faith and reason in the pursuit of knowledge.  The course aims to improve the student's capacity for critical reading, writing and thinking. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

2021. History of Modern Philosophy - This course introduces the student to western philosophy by focusing on the innovations of the modern age, roughly the period from the mid-17th to the early 19th century.  Emphasis will be placed on the philosophical movements known as Rationalism, Empiricism, and Idealism.  The course aims to improve the student's capacity for critical reading, writing and thinking. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

2031. 19th and 20th Century Philosophy - This course introduces the student to western philosophy by exploring some of its major themes from the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics typically covered include the nature of the self and subjectivity; knowledge; language, meaning, and mind; morality and society; and the future of philosophy.  The course aims to improve the student's capacity for critical reading, writing and thinking. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

2040. Logic - A systematic study of propositional (sentential) logic and predicate (quantificational) logic through identity with the aim of learning the formal methods of distinguishing correct from incorrect reasoning and application of these methods to various areas of inquiry. This course will increase the student's ability to reason rigorously. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

2045. Ethics: General Principles - This course offers a study of the nature of ethics and the ethical themes and theories that influence modern culture. This course will increase the student’s ability to think critically and thoroughly about ethical principles. Prerequisite: completion of any required non-degree credit courses. (3)

Upper Level Courses

2060. Environmental Philosophy - This course will increase the student's knowledge of humanity's understanding of its relationship to the natural environment. Topics include historically prominent conceptions of that relationship, the philosophical foundation of the contemporary environmental movement, and attempts to construct philosophically defensible environmental ethics. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

2080. African American Philosophy - A study of philosophical issues associated with the African American experience. This course will increase the student's knowledge of the nature of African American philosophy, the concepts of race and culture, the nature of racism and discrimination, and the justifiability of affirmative action. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

2081. African Philosophy - This course provides an introduction to African Philosophy. The course is divided into three parts. Part I will focus on recent debates about the nature and scope of African Philosophy. Issues to be examined here include: (1) philosophy and colonialism; (2) the significance of traditional African beliefs for contemporary philosophical practice; (3) individual thinkers and communal wisdom; and (4) writing versus speech as vehicles for philosophical expression. In Parts II and III we turn more explicitly to philosophical issues concerning (5) science, technology, and modernization in Africa; and (6) African political theory. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

2260. Philosophy of Art - This course will increase the student's knowledge of the theories of art, beauty, art criticism and creativity. It will focus not only on theoretical understanding of art but also on applications of these theories to the major arts. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)


2270. Philosophy of Religion
- This course will increase the student's knowledge of reasons for and against various fundamental religious beliefs; particularly arguments for the existence of God, the nature and significance of religious experience, the nature of religious faith, and the place of religion in culture as a whole. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

2400. Health Ethics - This course will survey a range of ethical issues pertaining to the health professions. Topics to be examined include: professional obligations and the physician-patient relationship, abortion, euthanasia, genetic research, experimentation, and the claim to health-care. Classroom time will be devoted to discussion of philosophical essays and case scenarios concerning these topics. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

2410. Business Ethics - This course will survey a range of ethical issues arising in our contemporary culture that we as individuals will encounter while working in institutions, business organizations, and the professions. Among the ethical issues to be examined are: the ethical basis of business, the rights and responsibilities of corporations and their employees, and the relations of business to society and the individual. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

3190. Legal Reasoning - (Serves as an elective in the Law and Humanities Minor.) This course will increase the student's knowledge of legal reasoning in statutory, common law, and constitutional interpretation and of philosophical issues of jurisprudence connected with legal reasoning. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

3250. Philosophy of Science - This course will increase the student's knowledge of the scientific method, the nature of science, and the relationship of science to other academic disciplines and to culture at large. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

3260. Philosophy of Law - (Serves as a requirement in the Law and Humanities Minor.) An examination of the relationship between law and morality, with particular attention to the use of moral principles in the analysis of legal doctrine. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours in philosophy. (3)

4001, 4002, 4003. Directed Reading - Prerequisite: six semester hours in philosophy and permission of chairperson. (1, 2, or 3)

4500S. Seminar - (Special Offerings) Prerequisite: 6 semester hours in phi­losophy or permission of instructor. (3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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PHYSICS (PHYS)

1061. (ENGR 1061) Modern Engineering Graphics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introduction to the basic techniques and concepts of engineering drawing including plane and descriptive geometry orthographic, isometric, sectional views, auxiliary views, and dimensional representations, and generating 2D and 3D computer designs. One hour of lecture and four hours of drawing and computer laboratory per week. (3)

1121. General Physics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. First of a three-course sequence (PHYS 1121-2111-2121) for majors in physics and engineering treating the fundamental laws and principles of the various fields of physics: mechanics, relativity. Lecture and laboratory courses are integrated in a class room equipped with computers, interfaced probes and traditional laboratory equipment that enhances the interactive learning, hands-on experiences and conceptual understanding of physics. Three two hour lecture/lab sessions and one one-hour problem session per week. Corequisite: Math 1070 (4)

1530. How Things Work - An introduction, for non-science majors, to basic concepts and principles of physics by learning how objects from everyday life, such as air conditioners, bicycles or microwave ovens, work, including sound and acoustics. It includes one laboratory session per week. (3)

2010/2010L. General Physics - Usually offered fall semester and 1st summer session. First of a two-course sequence (PHYS 2010-2020) treating the fundamental laws and principles of the various fields of physics: mechanics and heat. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1030. (3/1)

2020/2020L. General Physics - Usually offered spring semester and 2nd summer session. Second of a two-course sequence (PHYS 2010-2020) treating waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2010. (3/1)

2030. General Physics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introductory course in physics for pharmacy majors treating the basic concepts and principles of the various fields in physics: mechanics, heat, electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1030. (3)

2060/2060L. Physics of Music - Usually offered spring semester. Introduction to the physical and acoustical background of music with analysis of sound production and reception by voice, hearing and selected musical instruments in the laboratory. (2/1)

2061L. (SPTH 2061L) Physics of Music Laboratory - Usually offered spring semester. Special laboratory for speech pathology majors treating the unique problems associated with sound production by voice and sound reception by ear. To be taken along with PHYS 2060/2060L. (1)

2111. General Physics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Second of a three-course sequence (PHYS 1121-2111-2121) for majors in physics and engineering treating sound, vibrations and waves, heat and geometric optics. Lecture and laboratory courses are integrated in a class room equipped with computers, interfaced probes and traditional laboratory equipment that enhances the interactive learning, hands-on experiences and conceptual understanding of physics. Three two hour lecture/lab sessions and one one-hour problem session per week. Corequisite: MATH 2070. Prerequisite: PHYS 1121. (4)

2121. General Physics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Third of a three-course sequence (PHYS 1121-2111-2121) for majors in physics and engineering treating electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, physical optics, and modern physics. Lecture and laboratory courses are integrated in a class room equipped with computers, interfaced probes and traditional laboratory equipment that enhances the interactive learning, hands-on experiences and conceptual understanding of physics. Three two hour lecture/lab sessions and one one-hour problem session per week. Corequisite: MATH 2080. Prerequisite: PHYS 2111. (4)

2630. (ENGR 2630) Analytical Methods for Physics and Engineering - An introduction of methods of mathematical physics used in physics and engineering such as vector and tensor analysis, Fourier analysis techniques, phasors, special functions, variation subject to constraints and elementary renormalization group techniques. The topics are introduced in the context of specific physics and engineering problems in electricity and magnetism, network analysis, modern physics, thermodynamics and mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. Corequisite: MATH 2530. (3)

3010. (ENGR 3010) Electricity and MagnetismI - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A complete development of electromagnetic theory beginning with the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism, culminating with the development of Maxwell's equations, and ending with a treatment of plane electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121, PHYS 2630, MATH 2030, and MATH 2080. (3)

3011. Electricity and Magnetism II - Usually offered spring semester. A selection of more advanced topics in electromagnetism such as fields in material media, Laplace and Poisson's equations, topics from relativity, electromagnetic waves in waveguides and in conducting media, and gauge transformations. Prerequisites: PHYS 3010 and MATH 2530. (3)

3020. (ENGR 2020) Mechanics-Dynamics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Systematic presentation of elements of classical mechanics using language of vector algebra and vector calculus. Topics include kinematics, kinetics, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. (3)

3030. (ENGR 3030) Optics - Usually offered fall semester. Study of theories of geometrical and physical optics, including reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization, double-refraction, and lasers. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 or 2020 and MATH 2070. (3)

3040. (ENGR 3040) Thermodynamics - Usually offered spring semester. Study of heat and temperature, the thermodynamics laws, work, ideal gases, engines, refrigeration, reversibility, entropy, phase transitions. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 or PHYS 2020 and MATH 2030. (3)

3050. Modern Physics - Usually offered fall semester. Survey course on topics in contemporary physics. These include elements of the special theory of relativity, wave-particle duality, and elements of quantum theory as it applies to atoms, nuclei, molecules, and solids. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 or PHYS 2020 and MATH 2070. (3)

3120. (ENGR 2120/CPEN 2210) Network Analysis I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. An introduction to the analysis of linear, time-invariant circuits in response to steady-state and time-varying signals using various analytical tools including Kirchhoff's laws, and Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and 2630 and MATH 2030 and 2080. (3)

3210. (ENGR 2210) Mechanics-Statics - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Analysis of systems and bodies considering the fundamental concepts of statics, including vectors, two-dimensional and three-dimensional force systems, equilibrium, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. Prerequisites: PHYS 2121 and MATH 2080. (3)

3310L. Advanced Laboratory - Usually offered fall semester. For physics and en­gineering majors. Sophisticated experiments in optics and Modern Physics. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. (1)

3320L. Advanced Laboratory - Usually offered spring semester. For physics and engineering majors. Sophisticated experiments in electricity and magnetism, circuits and electronics. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. (1)

3510S - 3520S. Physics and Engineering Seminar - 3510 usually offered fall semester; 3520 usually offered spring semester. A seminar course for junior and senior physics and engineering majors, in which each student makes an oral and written presentation on a topic in physics or engineering. (1-1)

4050. Quantum Physics - Usually offered spring semester. The concepts and the mathematical methods of quantum mechanics. Topics include Schrodinger’s equation in time-dependent and time-independent forms; one- and three-dimensional solutions including the treatment of angular momentum and spin. Applications to simple systems such as the hydrogen atom, simple harmonic oscillator, and periodic potentials. Prerequisite: PHYS 3050. (3)

4200. Physics Projects - Usually offered fall semester. Detailed study (literature search) of one or more topics in physics. The student will submit a report on his/her study. One two-hour meeting per week. Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson or advisor. (1)

4210. Physics Projects - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Detailed study (discussion or experimentation) of one or more topics in physics. The student will make an oral presentation on his/her study. One two-hour meeting per week. Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson or advisor. (2)

4530. Special Topics - Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisites and corequisites: Permission of the instructor. (3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSCI)

1010. Introduction to Political Science - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and principles of political life. Focus is upon the development of the state; the role of ideology, and political participation, particularly the impact of the individual on politics. (3)

1020. American Government - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Issues of American politics, including the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, political parties and elections, presidency, congress, courts, the Bill of Rights, and political equality. (3)

2010. Research Methods - Usually offered fall semester. Origin of the discipline of political science and the understanding of the scientific method as it relates to the discipline. Research approaches and techniques in contemporary political science. (3)

2040. International Relations - Usually offered fall semester. Basic orientation to study of international politics. Various objectives of nations' foreign policy. Patterns of interaction among nations, transitional organizations, intergovernmental organizations, and non-state actors in the contemporary world, stressing the nature and sources of international conflict. (3)

2050. (PADM 2050) Introduction to Public Administration - Usually offered spring semester. Introduction to concepts, processes and methods involved in the administration of public agencies, including a survey of approaches used in the study of public administration. (3)

2060. International Law and Politics - An examination of the nature and role of international law. Reviews the effects and limitations international law has on the actions and policies of nation-states in contemporary world politics. (3)

2100. Law, Politics, and Society - Usually offered spring semester. An introduction to the nature, functions, and limits of law and legal institutions. Includes an analysis of the world's legal systems, but emphasizes the Anglo-American legal tradition. (3)

2120. Judicial Process - Usually offered fall semester. An examination of the major participants (lawyers, judges, juries, interest groups) in the court system and the structure and rules in criminal and civil trial and appellate proceedings. (3)

2390. State Politics - Politics at the state level, including the relationship of state government to local governments, state party politics, legislative and executive processes. (3)

2410. Public Opinion and Voting Behavior - Relationships among attitude, the family, the school, political culture, mass media, and factors influencing voting and other political behavior. (3)

2440. Black Politics - Usually offered fall semester. Basic approaches to the study of Black politics. An examination of the nature of racism and the methods employed by Blacks to overcome oppression. (3)

2511. Quantitative Analysis - A survey of introductory statistics examining both descriptive and inferential statistical processes. Prerequisite: completion of all developmental mathematics requirements and PSCI 2010. (3)

3010. Comparative Politics - Usually offered spring semester. Survey of different types of political systems and study of government and politics of some major nations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (3)

3040. International Organization - This course examines the historical, structural-functional, and decision-making approaches of international organizations. Emphasis will be on the United Nations and its specialized agencies, and other international organizations established specifically for political, economic and military purposes. (3)

3100. Constitutional Law - Usually offered fall semester. Development of the American Constitution as reflected in decisions of the Supreme Court; focuses on powers of the three branches of government and relationships of national government to states. (3)

3110. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties - Usually offered spring semester. Personal liberties under the Bill of Rights (such as freedom of speech, press, etc.) and the Fourteenth Amendment (due process, equal protection) as reflected in decisions of the Supreme Court. Recommended for pre-law students. (3)

3133. (CMST 2133) Mock Trial and Debate - An introduction to the techniques of argumentation and debate applied to trial courts and the judicial process. Prerequisite: CMST 1010. (3)

3240. Political Psychology - This course is an elective for majors or minors. It is to be offered every other fall semester. It will include a survey of psychological influences on political behavior; socialization and leadership styles; person and state perceptions; conformity; opinion and attitude formation; gender differences; ideological orientations; conflict, change, and group dynamics; analytical framework. Prerequisites: PSCI 1010, PSYC 1010 or permission of the instructor. (3)

3250. Political Thought - Usually offered fall semester. Survey of the history of political thought from the Greeks to the present, emphasizing major political thinkers and the classical writings of political theory. (3)

3270. Modern Political Thought - Usually offered every other spring semester. Origins, development, and transformation of modern political ideologies into political movements and regimes. (3)

3360PS. (PADM 3360PA) Public Policy - Usually offered fall semester. Development and content of public policy in the American political system, focusing primarily on the national level but also considering state and local levels; processes linking citizen demands and government action and stressing ways in which minorities might cope with and alter policy to serve their interest. (3)

3363. (PADM 3363) Environmental Policy - Examines the interrelationship between policy making and the human environment. This course will provide students with basic environmental literacy, outline policy making process, explore issues of environmental ethics, review the nexus between science and environmental policy making, and study the leadership roles African Americans assume in the environmental policy making process. (3)

3380. Presidency and Congress - Usually offered fall semester. Analysis of the structure of the American presidency and congress as well as the political forces which shape these institutions and their policies. (3)

3400. Urban Politics - Processes and structures of urban politics considered in core city and metropolitan contexts, stressing impacts of urban politics and distribution of power and various responses of citizens to effect changes in society. (3)

3460. Political Parties - Usually offered spring semester. Development, organization, and influence of political parties and interest groups. (3)

3640. American Foreign Policy - This course provides the student with a comprehensive examination of the American foreign policy-making process. Special emphasis is upon the role of various governmental institutions on the making and execution of policy; influences which shape American foreign policy; and decision-policy models within which the student can gain a greater appreciation of the events which shape our world. (3)


4050. African Politics and Government
- This course provides a comprehensive examination of the role of political leadership on the development of independent Black Africa with special emphasis on the influence of major personalities, the problems of African politics, nationalities, military politics, liberation movements, African ideologies, and economic integration and regional cooperation. (3)

4100. International Political Economy - This course focuses on the historical, theoretical, and contemporary perspectives of international political economy. Special attention is devoted to changing global patterns and the relationship between economics and politics, national and international security. (3)

4640. The Politics of Developing Nations - Usually offered every other fall semester. Types of political systems found in contemporary Africa, Asia, and Latin America, and a survey of government and politics of some major nations which are considered developing nations. (3)

4650. Democracy and Comparative Governments - Origin and development of the theory of democracy and its application to contemporary political systems. Focuses on political processes, institutions, and policies of selected governments. (3)

4800. Advanced Research in the Behavioral Sciences - Intended for students preparing for a research-oriented career or planning on pursuing graduate study in their discipline. Focus on quantitative analysis of data using mainframe computers and SPSS and the presentation of reports and hypothesis testing. Students will complete a significant research project within a general topic area and using a large data set selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: PSCI2511 and PSCI 2010, or consent of instructor. (3)

4901PS, 4902PS, 4903PS. Independent Study - Intensive individual readings in areas agreed upon by student, instructor, and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4911PS, 4912PS, 4913PS. Independent Research - Research project on topic agreed upon by student, instructor, and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4920UV. Seminar in Urban Studies - In-depth study of a particular urban policy area such as housing, race, transportation, employment, welfare, etc. Field observations and class reports included. (3)

4930S. Special Topics Seminar - Critical analysis and exploration of issues in politics and political inquiry through discussions of reports and research studies. Topics vary according to the interests of department faculty and majors. Some possible topics are Black Political Organizations, New Orleans Politics, Politics of Education, Women and Politics, etc. (3)

4953UV/4956UV. Political Internship - Placement with an elected official, public agency, "quasi-public" sector-related agency or consular agency under field supervisor. Student prepares written analysis of his/her experience in relation to theoretical concepts studied in courses. Student reports to field assignment rather than having classes, assignments, and examinations; the formal class meeting is a conference period with the instructor at one or two week intervals as scheduled. Graded on Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3 for 10 hrs/week field assignment; 6 for 20 hrs/week field assignment)

4963/4966. Legal Internship - Placement with a law office or judicial agency under field supervisor. Student prepares written analysis of his experience in relating the internship experience to literature in the field and meets with the instructor at two week intervals as scheduled. Graded on Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3 for 10 hrs/week field assignment / 6 for 20 hrs/week field assignment)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

1010. Introductory Psychology - Usually offered fall, spring, and summer semesters. Foundation for more advanced study. Includes history and methodology, development, biological basis of behavior, learning and memory, personality, psychopathology, and social influences on behavior. (3)

1012. Human Development - A study of the individual from birth to senescence. Emphasizes normal physical, emotional, and intellectual development. (3)

2010. History and Systems in Psychology - Offered occasionally. A survey of philosophical, theological, and physiological roots of psychology as well as more contemporary views and trends. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 or permission of instructor. (3)

2020. Experimental Psychology - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Examines the methods of psychology such as observation, case study, and experimentation. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010. (3)

2070. Comparative Psychology - Investigates animal behavior in the laboratory and in natural and semi-natural settings. Focuses on the application of knowledge about animal behavior to the explanation of human behavior. Discusses such issues as aggression, communication, and the genetic basis for behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010. (3)

2080. Writing in Psychology - Offered periodically. Provides an introduction to written communication in psychology and related social sciences. Includes information on selecting topics, gathering and organizing information, using APA style, proofreading, etc. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010. (3)

2110. Human Sexuality - Designed to cover a full spectrum of health issues in human sexuality, this course will cover psychological, physiological, social, developmental, spiritual, and interpersonal factors in human sexuality. Its goals are to provide objective information, develop research interests in the field, highlight the most recent developments, literature, and discoveries in this area, and to promote sexual health at all levels. The major emphasis will be to inspire healthy decision making. Prerequisites: PSYC 1010 or permission of the instructor. (3)

2511. (BHSC 2511) Analytic Research I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A calculational survey of introductory statistics. Will examine both descriptive and inferential statistical processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010 and completion of all developmental mathematics requirements. (3)

2512. Introduction to Research - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Research approach to selected topics from PSYC/BHSC 2511; scientific report writing, logic of scientific method, research design, library research, and readings from the literature. Pre-requisites: PSYC 1010, PSYC/BHSC 2511 or MATH 1020 or STAT 2010, and PSYC 2020. (3)

PSYCHOLOGY 1010, 2020, AND 2512, OR PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR ARE THE PREREQUISITES FOR ALL 3000 AND 4000 PSYCHOLOGY COURSES. EXCEPTIONS ARE PSYC 3041, 4011, 4012, AND 4013 (SPECIFIC PREREQUISITES FOR THESE COURSES ARE INDICATED WITH THE COURSE DESCRIPTION).

3010. Social Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. Survey of social influences on behavior. Includes affiliation and interpersonal attraction; person perception; conformity; attitude formation, assessment, and change; prejudice; aggression; social learning; and group dynamics. (3)

3020. (EDUC 3020) Child Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. Study of physiological, intellectual, social, emotional, and moral factors affecting child growth and development. (3)

3025. Adult Development and Aging - A survey of adult development and aging from young adult to old age. The influence of biological, psychological, socio-cultural, and life cycle forces will be examined with an emphasis on normal development. (3)

3030. Cognitive Psychology - Examines mental processing through the study of thinking, problem solving, and memory. Includes such topics as artificial intelligence, heuristics vs. algorithms, mnemonics, and cognitive development in children. (3)

3040. (EDUC 3040) Educational Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. Study of the nature, conditions, outcomes, and evaluation of learning. Systems approach; use of a variety of media and optimum clinical experience; cognitive and affective factors influencing learning process. (3)

3041. Black Psychology - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. This course is designed to generate critical and analytic thinking about each student's identity as a member of American society and as a member of the "global village." The course is reading/writing intensive as it investigates "the Black Experience." As the course progresses, the student is expected to be more facile in his/her ability to influence and change our psychosociocultural environment in positive and meaningful ways. (3)

3045. Industrial/Organizational Psychology - An introduction to the theories, methods, findings and applications of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Topics include the principles and techniques of selection of personnel, the application of psychological principles to the training of organization members work attitudes and motivation, various theoretical approaches to leadership, organizational communication, and organizational structure and design. (3)

3050. Physiological Psychology - Usually offered fall semester. This is a basic introductory course in the field of neuroscience. It examines the biological basis of behaviors such as aggression, reproduction, sleep, dreaming, and mental disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL 1030 or 1230. (3)

3080. Abnormal Psychology - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Classifications from DSM-IV will form the foundation for viewing the dynamics of behavior and the diagnostic basis for psychopathology. Primarily a systematic, descriptive, and theoretical approach that discusses etiology and pathophysiologic processes when they are known. (3)

3090. Forensic Psychology - Involves the application of psychological and clinical skills to legal, criminal justice, sociological, and political issues. Includes such concepts as “expert witness” testimony, the concept of “amicus curiae,” and the process of jury selection. (3)

3100. Psychology of Learning - Usually offered spring semester. A survey of the major theories and empirical research. Topics include principles of classical and operant conditioning, reinforcement, motivation, and forgetting. (3)

3110. Psychotherapies - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A comprehensive examination of the major forms of psychotherapy and the different views of psychopathology. The focus will be on personal growth and improvement, as well as on the correction of individual problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 3080. (3)

3120. Tests and Measurements - Survey of the method­ology of assessment, test design and construction, test administration and scoring, achievement and intelligence testing, personality observations and inventories, and issues in ethics and applications of testing. Prerequisites: MATH 1020 could be used in place of PSYC 2511 as a prerequisite. (3)

3200L. Psychology Laboratory - A research course designed to give students direct experience in conducting experimental laboratory research. Students will participate in the design and implementation of experiments, both as experimenters and experimental subjects, and provide oral and written research reports. (1)

4000S. Seminar - Offered rarely. Content varies according to current developments in field of psychology and student needs. (3)

4010. Theories of Personality - A survey of the major personality theories and their authors, as well as their systematic approaches to developing their theories. (3)

4011, 4012, 4013. Independent Study - Offered periodically. Intensive individual readings on topic agreed upon by student and the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4030. The Psychology of Group Dynamics - Offered periodically. Designed to explore theory and research dealing with group processes. Emphasis is placed on the individual within the group and the application of theory and research to real world situations. Topics to be covered include group development and socialization, individual conformity and influence, individual performance in groups, decision making, and crowds and collective behavior. (3)

4040. Psychology of Gender - Focuses on how gender as a social construct shapes the lives of men and women in contemporary society. Specific issues addressed include ideas and stereotypes about masculinity and femininity; gender differences and similarities in cognitive abilities, personality, and social behavior, gender roles in families; the economic dynamics associated with gender; representations of men and women in the media and culture; and the potential for change in gender relations and gender inequality. Prerequisites: PSYC 3010. (3)

4050. Psychopharmacology - Emphasizes the biomedical model in the treatment of mental and behavioral disorders. Also examines the use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other drug therapies for the treatment of psychopathologies. Prerequisites: PSYC 3080. (3)

4080. Community Psychology - Community Psychology is an integral component of Clinical Psychology and the Clinical Curriculum within the University’s Psychology Department. Primarily, this course will introduce students to the nature of “indirect services” (as opposed to direct service such as individual psychotherapy or drug therapy) which are based on primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Community Psychology is an action science: its goal is to understand critical social issues and problems through research, theory, and action. Prerequisites: PSYC 3080 and 3110 or permission of the instructor for non- majors. (3)

4090. (EDUC 4090) Adolescent Psychology - Usually offered spring semester. Char­acteristics and attendant problems of adolescent growth and development. Relevant techniques in teaching and guidance based on modern research. Prerequisite: PSYC 3040. (3)

4398-4399. Clinical Practicum - 4398 usually offered fall semester; 4399 usually offered spring semester. Supervised practice in the application of psychological techniques to clinical settings, counseling settings, and clinical administrative settings. Taught with the training staffs of cooperating institutions and agencies. Prerequisite: PSYC 3080, permission of instructor and 3.0 grade point average in psychology. (3)

4996. Historical and Applied Perspectives in Psychology - This course involves the critical analysis and exploration of major issues in psychology. The focus is the integration of knowledge and the process of disseminating knowledge. Topics vary according to the interests of the faculty and changes in the field. Prerequisites: PSYC 1010, 2020, 2511 or MATH 1020 or STAT 2010, PSYC 2512, and the completion of the majority of major courses. (3)

4997-4998. Advanced Topics in Psychology I, II - Offered occasionally. A comprehensive analysis, synthesis, and integration of the scientific principles, theoretical foundations, and applications of the major subdisciplines within the field of psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1012, 2010, 3010, 3050, 3080, and PSYC/BHSC 2511. (1,1)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (PADM)

2050. (PSCI 2050) Introduction to Public Administration - Introduction to concepts, processes and methods involved in administration of public agencies, including a survey of approaches used in the study of Public Administration. (3)

3360PA. (PSCI 3360PS) Public Policy - Usually offered fall semester. Development and content of public policy in American political system, focusing on national level but also considering state and local levels; processes linking citizen demands and government action and stressing ways in which minorities might cope with and alter policy to serve their interest. (3)

3363. (PSCI 3363) Environmental Policy - Examines the interrelationship between policy making and the human environment. This course will provide students with basic environmental literacy, outline policy making process, explore issues of environmental ethics, review the nexus between science and environmental policy making, and study the leadership roles African Americans assume in the environmental policy making process. (3)

3370. Administrative Behavior - Usually offered spring semester. Concepts of administrative behavior in public organizations, including decision-making, leadership, small group behavior, and analysis of such organizations as social systems. (3)

3500. Public Personnel Administration - Usually offered every other spring semester. Basic properties, practices, and issues of public personnel administration including recruitment, management, motivation, and ethics in public service. Prerequisite: PADM 2050. (3)

3510. Public Financial Administration - Usually offered every other spring semester. Emphasizes the budget process as related to programs conditioned by revenue estimates based upon taxes, assessments, and appropriations. Prerequisite: PADM 2050. (3)

3520. Program Planning and Evaluation - Usually offered every other fall semester. Introduction to the techniques of program planning and evaluation as a government process. Prerequisite: PADM 2050. (3)

4530S. Public Administration Seminar - Usually offered spring semester. Selected topics in public administration with an attempt to relate field experiences of students to principles of administration. Prerequisite: PADM 2050. (3)

4901PA, 4902PA, 4903PA. Independent Study - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Intensive individual readings on topic agreed upon by student and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4911PA, 4912PA, 4913PA. Independent Research - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Research project on topic agreed upon by student, instructor, and chairperson. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4953UV/4956UV. Urban Administrative Internship - Placement with an elected official, public agency, or "quasi-public" sector related agency under field supervisor. Student prepares written analysis of his experience in relation to theoretical concepts studied in courses. Student reports to field assignment rather than having classes, assignments, and examinations; the formal class meeting is a conference period with the instructor at one or two week intervals as scheduled. Graded on Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3 for 10 hrs/week field assignment / 6 for 20 hrs/week field assignment)

READING AND STUDY SKILLS (RDNG)

0992. Reading and Study Skills - A course designed to help students develop and demonstrate their competence in reading and improve their study skills. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, literal, inferential and critical reading skills. (3, non-degree credit)

2010. Critical Reading - A course designed to help students go beyond the literal interpretation of what is read. The student learns to question, analyze, evaluate information helping to make informed judgments. Reading materials for this course will provide the opportunity to judge the author’s qualifications and purpose, and to sort facts from opinions. Also to become alert to unfounded assumptions, fallacious reasoning and illogical conclusions. (3)

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SALES AND MARKETING (SMKT)

2020. (ART 2020) Introduction to Graphic and Advertising Design - An introduction to visual communication graphics and design with an emphasis on printed materials. Illustrative graphics, symbol/logo design, typography, layout principles systems, camera-ready art and the use of computer technology are part of this course. (3)

2050. Principles of Marketing - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Basic course. Nature and scope of modern marketing management; outlines the areas in which decisions are made in developing and implementing price, distribution, product, and promotion strategies. (3)

3060. Marketing Strategy - Usually offered fall semester. Marketing problems analyzed and decisions reached, emphasizing the management point of view. Prerequisite: SMKT 2050 and ACCT 1010 or permission of chairperson. (3)

3090. Customer Relationship Management - Usually offered spring semester. The course will help students identify actions that businesses use to categorize and address customers effectively through the use of information and technology. This will also help students learn the benefits of knowing customers more intimately and show them how information can be used to increase revenues, satisfaction, and profitability. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050. (3)

3350. Marketing Research - Usually offered spring semester. Analysis of marketing problems and basic research designs. Included topics: basic data collection methods; formulation of problems; sources of information; composition of data collection forms; design of samples; tabulation of data; analysis of data; preparation of reports. Actual problems and cases are utilized. Application of marketing research is related to product, place, price, promotion, other areas of marketing. Computer programs may be utilized to solve some problems. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050, ECON 2070, or permission of the chairperson. (3)

3500. Personal Selling - Usually offered fall semester. This course will focus on personal selling presentations and relationship development. Students will examine consultative selling techniques and relationship management strategy in order to add value through selling. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050. (3)

3530. Sales Force Management - Organization, communications process, group influences, forecasting, recruiting, training, design, motivation, supervision, compensation, control of sales organizations. Prerequisites: SMKT 2050. (3)

3550. Consumer Behavior - Usually offered spring semester. Consumer attitudes, motivations, reactions in market, drawing on marketing, economics, psychology, sociology, theories. Prerequisite: SMKT 2050. (3)

3600. Integrated Marketing Communications - Usually offered spring semester. Emphasis is upon integrated promotional programs. The study of the advertiser, the agency, the media, and their functions as matched with consumer behavior. Advertising, public relations, personal selling, promotional packaging, along with many other sales stimulating methods and techniques are covered. Prerequisite: SMKT 2050. (3)

3700. Multivariate Data Analysis - Usually offered fall semester. This course will focus on advanced marketing research methods (multivariate data analysis techniques). Students will examine various multivariate techniques and apply them to managerial marketing situations and research questions. Pre-requisites: SMKT 2050, ECON 2070, and ECON 2080 or [MATH 1020 (STAT 2010) and MATH 2040 (STAT 2020)]. (3)

4000. Sales and Marketing Seminar - Usually offered spring semester. A survey of topics/issues of current interest in marketing. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of the chairperson. (3)

4010S. (MGT 4010S) Leadership Seminar - One of the key aspect of management is its focus on leadership. For centuries the concept of whether leaders are “born or made” has been a subject of debate. Students will be required to read between three to five current books on key management topics and they will be required to analyze the leadership concepts and impacts on the leader’s organization. Additionally, student will be required to read and analyze specific cases in leadership and to conduct a research term paper on a key topic in this area. Prerequisites: senior standing. (3)

4501, 4502, 4503. Directed Readings in Marketing - Reading in area of marketing mutually agreed upon by professor and student which is not covered by current course. Prerequisite: permission of chairperson. (1, 2, 3)

4999. (BSAD 4999) Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)

1010. Introduction to Sociology - Usually offered each semester. Available as a service learning course. This course offers students the opportunity to develop their sociological imaginations through studying the patterns and regularities of social behavior, the structure and organization of society, social institutions, socialization, and social change. (3)

SOCIOLOGY 1010 IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER SOCIOLOGY COURSES

1020. Introduction to Applied Sociology - This course is an overview of applied sociology as a social science. The course defines applied sociology and identifies the major themes within this subfield. (3)

1030. Introduction to Women’s Studies - This course is an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural introduction to the study of women. Focusing on intersections of class, race, and gender, students will investigate the ramifications of cultural, social, economic, political, psychological and spiritual forces on women’s lives. Students will also explore how structures of domination, power, and identity affect, define, and shape women. (3)

2000. Social Welfare as an Institution - This course is an examination of the basic institutional framework of the concept of social welfare in the United States and its historical establishment as an institution. Formulation of social policies and programs, particularly during the 20th century, is examined and evaluated. Emphasis placed on the influence of the societal context of applied social science professions. (3)

2010. Social Problems - Usually offered each spring semester. This course, often offered as a service learning course, examines societal and cultural conflicts and dilemmas through the use of the principles of sociology, most especially critical analysis. Topics generally include poverty and inequality, health and health care, issues confronting families, and social problems associated with government and economic change. The course emphasizes formulating plausible, compassionate, and just solutions to social problems. (3)

2030. (AFAM 2030) Survey of Africa - Interdisciplinary course dealing with traditional (pre-European), colonial, and post-independence African political, social, and economic structures and institutions. Course also focuses on problems of social, political, and economic development facing contemporary African nations. (3)

2042. Introduction to Criminal Justice - This course introduces the processes, institutions and administration of criminal justice in the United States. It examines criminal law and discusses law enforcement, criminal prosecution, bail diversion, the jury trial and sentencing as it explores the correctional system, including probation, prisons, inmates’ rights and parole, and juvenile justice. (3)

2050. Marriage and Family - This course is a detailed examination of the structure, process, and functioning of the family; it also identifies crises facing the family. Included are a study of cross-cultural variations in family relationships, marriage patterns and processes and family functions. (3)

2055. Black Family - This course is a study of the Black family in the U.S. It compares and contrasts differences and similarities among Black families, especially taking into account class and family formation. This course also addresses the treatment of the Black family in academic and governmental literature. Prerequisite: SOCI 2050. (3)

2060. Race and Ethnic Relations - This course is concerned with examining issues, problems, and research findings on race, ethnic, and minority group relations. Emphasis is on U.S. Black-White relations, American ethnic groups, religious conflict, and racial and ethnic group contacts in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (3)

2510. Quantitative Research Methods and Applied Social Statistics - Usually offered alternate fall semesters. This course introduces students to quantitative research methods and statistical applications used in sociology and the social sciences. Students develop the following skills in this course: interpreting and analyzing social scientific research, designing sociological research, and applying sociological research and statistical principles to data. Prerequisite: MATH 1010. (3)

2520. Qualitative Research Methods - Usually offered alternate spring semesters. Usually offered as a service learning course. Students learn to employ qualitative research methods and forms of data collection through the following techniques: survey (questionnaire and interview), participant and non-participant observation, focus group analysis, use of secondary analysis, and experimentation. The course is both theoretical and applied sociology. (3)

3020. Political Sociology - This course focuses on the nature of power, sources of authority, functions of the state, types of political systems, political culture, political socialization, community power structure studies, the nature of individual participation in the political system, political development and change, and political violence. (3)

3025. (AFAM 3025) 20 th Century African American Urban Life - This interdisciplinary course examines African Americans as agents in shaping the 20 th century urban experience in the United States. The central focus of the course will be the development of cultural, social, religious, economic, educational and political institutions. Examples will be drawn from among communities such as Harlem, NY, the Central Avenue district of Los Angeles, Chicago’s south side, and the Auburn Avenue district of Atlanta, as well as others. Prerequisite: AFAM 2000. (3)

3030. Sociological Theory - Usually offered each fall semester. This course, formulated in socio-historical context, addresses the major theoretical paradigms within, and the major contributors to, the development of sociological theory. (3)

3040. Demography - This course addresses the principles of population analysis in a global context, most especially as they assess rates of birth, death, and migration. Additional topics include issues of differential health, education, occupation, life expectancy, and life span. (3)

3042. Deviance - Usually offered each fall semester. This survey course explores the establishment and maintenance of deviant categories, the motivations behind deviant behavior, formal and informal means of identifying deviants, the effect of institutionalization upon the deviant, and how deviants attempt to avoid a label society places upon them. (3)

3044. Crime and Delinquency - This course is an introduction to the study of criminology. It covers the use and abuse of crime statistics; sociological models of crime delinquency; patterns of criminal behavior; history and substantive analysis of criminal justice institutions and processes. (3)

3050. Principles and Methods of Applied Sociology - This course is concerned with the research methodologies within applied sociology. Specific attention is given to values, skills, and techniques employed by professional, applied social scientists. (3)

3060. Aging, Death and Dying - This course is a survey of problems of aging and mortality, with a special emphasis on sociological perspectives within gerontology. (3)

3070. Medical Sociology - This course provides a sociological perspective on issues in health care and health care delivery for students preparing for any health care profession. (3)

3080. Social Stratification - Usually offered alternate spring semesters. This course is about social inequality. It addresses the causes and effects of crystallized, historical, institutional, procedural, systemic, unequal distribution of desirable but scarce values among ranked population groupings (social strata), with major attention given to this social phenomenon within urban industrial society. (3)

3085. (AFAM 3085) Sociology of the African American Experience - Through the appli- cation of sociological concepts, theory, and methods, this course will focus on the socio-historical experience of African Americans. Included will be a critical examination of the African Diaspora. Prerequisites: SOCI 2060 and AFAM 2000. (3)

3100. Social Policy - This course is an analysis of social policy developments in the United States, and how said relate to international perceptions of the U.S.. Contemporary and futuristic social policies are also examined. (3)

3250. Youth and Adolescence - This course is an examination of the problems of America's youth and society's attempt to deal with them. Focus of the course is on child welfare services, juvenile delinquency, and the emergent upheaval of children with special needs. (3)

3300. Small Group Dynamics - This course is an examination of the dynamics of small group interaction through an investigation of current social scientific research related to said. (3)

4000. Human Behavior and the Social Environment - This course is an overview of the sociological foundations of human behavior in everyday life. Special attention is given to human behavior in institutional and societal settings, with an emphasis placed upon theories of personal development and family systems. (3)

4010. Sociology of Education - The course addresses the processes and patterns in educational systems. Its focus is on identifying, analyzing, and solving community educational problems. (3)

4020. Urban Sociology - Usually offered each spring semester. Service learning course. Urban sociology is the study of the origin and growth of cities, including the following topics: patterns of social organization and lifestyles in urban areas, metropolitan structure, suburbanization, and major metropolitan problems, including housing, finance, education, and "white flight." The U.S. urban experience is emphasized. Additional focus is placed on world-wide comparative urban situations. (3)

4040. Social Change - This course addresses classical and modern theories of change in social structure and relationships. Also covered is a discussion of specific kinds of change/revolutions: social movements, economic growth and development, and modernization. (3)

4042. Sociology of Law - This course is an exercise in the application of sociological concepts, theory, and methods, in socio-historical context, relative to the importance of the law as a social institution. The law is treated as a socially constructed, dynamic, ever-changing construct. (3)

4045. Comparative Societies - Usually offered alternate fall semesters. This course is a sociological examination of the “developing” world. Focusing on comparative and historical in-depth analysis, students investigate various African, Asian and Latin American cultures and social structures. Specifically, the course will focus on the political economy of these continents, their historical and contemporary relations with the “West”, social stratification, and comparative social structures. (3)

4050. Social Organization - Usually offered alternate fall semesters. Service learning course. This course addresses the performance and effectiveness of formal organizations. A featured aspect of this course is an analysis of the environment created by formal organizations, and the socialization of the members of formal organizations. (3)

4081, 4082, 4083. Guided Readings in Sociology - This category of courses is open only to majors; non-majors must receive the approval of the departmental chairperson. Course content is dependent upon faculty discretion. (1, 2, 3)

4100. Seminar in Applied Sociology - This course is designed to expose students to the praxis of applied social science. Students will conduct independent and group research that analyzes social service agencies and organizations. (3)

4650. Sociology of Women - This course is a multi-disciplinary examination of the social, political, and economic status of women in global context, with particular attention paid to said in U.S. society and to the differential socialization of women and men. (3)

4950. Internship - This course involves the placement of a student in the field at a non-profit agency, governmental office, etc., under the dual supervision of an on-sight evaluator and an assigned faculty member. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. (3)

4960. Pro-Seminar - This course is for advanced majors only. Offered occasionally and upon request of faculty/students. (3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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SPANISH (SPAN)

1010-1020. Elementary Spanish - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary for basic communication in the language. Students will be given ample opportunity to express themselves in Spanish, both orally and in writing. All four language skills of speaking, writing, reading, and listening will be developed and various aspects of Spanish culture will also be presented. (3-3)

2010-2020. Intermediate Spanish - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Review of grammar and further development of language skills in reading, writing, conversation and listening comprehension. Hispanic and pre-Hispanic culture are presented through short stories (first semester). Continued development of the four language skills with intensive, in-depth study of the Spanish subjunctive. Short stories will be read and discussed with emphasis upon literary and cultural analysis (2 nd. semester) (3-3)

2051. Spanish for Medical Personnel - This course provides a foundation of knowledge and experience for health care providers, enabling better communication with the Hispanic community. Vocabulary and grammar will be presented in a health care context. Students will also be given the opportunity to develop skills of listening and speaking Spanish. Spanish will be spoken at all times in class. Prerequisite: SPAN 1020 or equivalent. (3)

3001-3002. Advanced Grammar and Composition - Intensive review of grammar. Emphasis on verbs, idioms, the subjunctive, and the spoken language. Prerequisites: SPAN 2010-2020 or permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3-3)

3010. Readings in Spanish American Literature - The development of Spanish America as seen in its literature, from the Popol Vuh through the Romantics, Modernists, the novel of social protest, and contemporary authors (3)

3011-3012. Advanced Conversation - Conversation based on texts, videos, and Web-based sources. Analysis of cultural and some literary texts. Prerequisites: SPAN 2010-2020 or permission of instructor and department chairperson. (3-3)

3110-3120. Survey of Spanish Literature - Main authors and literary trends from the Cantar de Mio Cid to 1650 (first semester). Main authors and literary trends from 1700 to the present (second semester) (3-3)

3130-3140. Survey of Spanish American Literature - Main authors and literary trends from the Popol Vuh through Romanticism (first semester). Main authors and literary trends from Modernismo and Realismo to the present (second semester) (3-3)

3540. Spanish-American Novel - Development of the Spanish American novel as it correlates to Spanish American history, with emphasis upon the twentieth century. (3)

3550. Spanish-American Poetry - Indigenous poetry through the twentieth century with emphasis upon trends and major figures since 1888. (3)

4020. Afro-Hispanic Studies - This course is a panoramic survey of Afro-Hispanic history and literature from early Peninsular and Latin American writings through their transformation and development into a corpus of literary works throughout Latin America. The course is open to all upper-level students who are interested in acquiring in-depth knowledge of the international African Diasporan presence in the Spanish-speaking areas of the New World. The language of instruction is English; students who have a high level of proficiency in Spanish will read the required texts in that language. (3)

4031-4041, 4032-4042, 4033-4043. Directed Readings in Spanish - Readings in an area of Spanish literature mutually agreed upon by teacher and student which is not covered by a current course. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chairperson. (1-1, 2-2, 3-3)

4050. Internship - Placement in a supervised work or research situation using Spanish. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson. (3)

4051-4052. Special Topics in Spanish - Critical analysis and exploration of Spanish language, culture, and literature. Topics vary according to the needs and interests of department faculty and majors. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of credit. Prerequisites: 6 hours of Spanish beyond Spanish 2020, a rating of Intermediate High on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Interview, or permission of the instructor. (3-3)

4053. (FREN 4053, LANG 4053) Introduction to Literary Criticism of Spanish, Hispanic, American, French, and Francophone Literature - This course is a capstone course designed for the upper-level students majoring in either French or Spanish. Through readings of both critical texts and literary works, students develop a comprehension of the relationships among history, culture, ideology, and literary production. Students read the literary works under study in their target languages. Discussion is in English in order to accommodate majors from both languages. (3)

4080. (FREN 4080, LANG 4080) Foreign Language Teaching Methodology - An examination of conventional methodologies of teaching foreign languages. This presentation will be directed to both primary and secondary levels and will include the following topics, among others: analysis of the theoretical premises upon which each method is founded; critical assessment of the strengths and limitations of each method; demonstration of classroom techniques derived from the various methods; discussion of the proficiency orientation contained in each method; and analysis of current textbooks and materials with discussion of how they reflect the theories under study. The practical component of the course will be integrated through demonstrations of teaching techniques, peer teaching, class observations, and hands-on activities. (3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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Communication Studies (CMST)

1010. Fundamentals of Public Speaking - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. A performance-oriented course that requires students to present several speeches. Major emphasis is placed on preparation, organization, delivery, and the development of confidence and poise. (3)

1011H. Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Honors) - This is a performance-oriented honors course that requires students to present several speeches. Major emphases are placed on preparation, organization, delivery, and the development of confidence and poise. Students will also participate in a service learning project within the New Orleans community. Prerequisite: Standardized test score or high school GPA; eligibility for ENGL 1010; and previous coursework or permission of chairperson. (3)

1070. Voice and Diction - Analysis of characteristics of good voice and speech usage. Use of IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet). (3)

2001, 3001, 4001. Communication Studies Practicum - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Practical experience in public speaking, oral interpretation, and/or debate inside and outside of the classroom under direct faculty supervision. Prerequisites: CMST 1010 and permission of instructor. No more than 3 semester hours credit may be earned. This course does not fulfill the core curriculum requirement. ( 1-1-1)

2010. Performance of Literature - The study of literature through performance. Reading, analysis, and performance of literary texts. General introduction to performance studies. (3)

2020. General Semantics - Study of the significance and influence of meaning in language. Emphasis is on practical applications the uses and misuses of language in media, advertising, politics, and propaganda. (3)

2070. Interpersonal Communication - Usually offered fall semester. Designed to increase students’ understanding and implementation of effective interpersonal communication behavior and skills. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and nonverbal elements affecting communication between individuals, family, peer groups, and work contexts. Students will participate in activities designed to develop interpersonal communications skills and assess their communications competence using various assessment tools. Prerequisite: CMST 1010. (3)

2075. Special Topics in Communication Studies - A seminar-type course that will focus on a specific issue or area within the field of Communication Studies. Before enrolling, students should consult the instructor regarding the topic and course requirements. Prerequisite: CMST 1010. Students may enroll in CMST 2075 a maximum of two times. (3)

2133. (PSCI 3133) Mock Trial and Debate - An introduction to the techniques of argumentation and debate applied to trial courts and the judicial process. Prerequisite: CMST 1010. (3)

2180. Advanced Public Speaking - Usually offered fall semester. Includes both a study of rhetorical analysis and practical experience in public speaking. Students will be required to deliver several speeches. (3)

2400. The Theatre - Survey of the major elements of theatre production and their combined theatrical effect. Includes overview of theatre history and reading of some significant plays. Special emphasis on Black Theatre. (3)

2500. Intercultural Communication - Familiarizes students with basic concepts, approaches, processes, and contexts which form the foundation for critical discussion of cross-cultural interaction. (3)

3040. Small Group Communication - A study of problem solving through group discussion; major emphasis on group dynamics, problem solving and discussion techniques. Students will gain practical experience by participating in several formal discussions. (3)

4020. Argumentation and Debate - Principles, structures, and techniques of debate including practical implementation using current national debate topic. (3)

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SPEECH PATHOLOGY (SPTH)

1320. Introduction to Communication Disorders - Usually offered fall semester. Definitions and methods of identifying various speech-language disorders, five hours of observation required. (3)

2075. Special Topics in Speech Pathology/Audiology - Offered as needed. In-depth study through lecture, discussion, and research of a particular area or issue in the field of speech pathology or audiology. Specific subject matter to be chosen by the faculty. Prerequisites: At least six semester hours of speech pathology/audiology courses or permission of instructor. (3)

2310. Phonetics - Usually offered spring semester. Developmental use of the International Phonetic Alphabet for normal and irregular speech patterns. (3)

2340. (BIOL 2340) Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanism - Usually offered fall semester. Identification and function of anatomical structures pertinent to the processes of speech and hearing. BIOLOGY CREDIT AWARDED TO SPEECH PATHOLOGY MAJORS AND MINORS ONLY. (4)

2500. Speech and Hearing Science - Usually offered spring semester. The basic principles of acoustics as applied to (a) the production of speech, including respiration, phonation, articulation, resonation, and (b) the perception of speech including auditory behavior. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320 and 2340. (3)

2730. Normal Language Development - Usually offered spring semester. Study of the normal acquisition and development of language; five hours of observation required. Prerequisite: SPTH 1320. (3)

2760. Methods and Materials - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to the techniques and materials used in speech and language assessment, treatment, ethics and professionalism and structure of clinical practice. . Five hours of observation required. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320 and 2730. (3)

2920. Articulation Disorders - Usually offered fall semester. Study of speech development, the causes of articulation disorders and procedures and methods for evaluation and treatment. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320 and 2310. (3)

3335. Audiology - Usually offered fall semester. Problems of hearing, etiologies, testing, and treatment in relation to hearing disorders. Prerequisites: SPTH 2340 and 2500. (3)

3340. Aural Rehabilitation - Usually offered fall semester. Interpretation of audiograms, auditory training, speech reading, prevention of hearing loss, special problems of acoustically handicapped. Prerequisite: SPTH 3535. (3)

3535. Hearing Testing - Usually offered spring semester. Theory and practicum for differential diagnostic audiometric testing. Includes basic pure tone, speech and special testing for determining site of lesion. Five hours of observation required. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320, 2340, 2500 and 3335. (3)

3560. Fluency Disorders - Usually offered spring semester. Exploration of stuttering theories, etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, and treatment. Prerequisite: SPTH 1320. (3)

4010. Language Disorders - Usually offered spring semester. Study of the nature and causes of language disorders in children and the evaluation and therapeutic procedures used. Five hours of observation required. Prerequisite: SPTH 2730. (3)

4090. Advanced Phonetics - Offered as required. Observation and recording of idiolect and dialect. Special emphasis given to dialectolalia. (3)

4320. Voice Disorders - Usually offered spring semester. Etiology, physiology, and pathology associated with the acoustic symptoms of the disorder; evaluation and current methods in voice pathology management. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320 and 2340. (3)

4601P-4602P. Clinical Practicum in Speech Pathology - Supervised experience working with persons with speech, language, and/or hearing problems; including screenings, evaluations and therapy. A minimum of 25 clock hours per semester. Prerequisites: SPTH 1320, 2310, 2340, 2730, 2760, and 2920. (2-2) Fall, Spring

4601A-4602A. Clinical Practicum in Audiology - Supervised experience in performing hearing screenings, and evaluations. A minimum of 15 clock hours for the first semester and 25 clock hours for the second semester. Prerequisites: SPTH 2340, 3335, and 3525. (1-2) Fall, Spring

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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STATISTICS (STAT)

2010.* (MATH 1020 – Basic Statistics I) Statistical Methods I - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Descriptive statistics, probability and statistical inference. Prerequisite: Completion of all developmental mathematics deficiencies. (3)

*Students may not receive credit for both STAT 2010 (MATH 1020) and ECON 2070.

2020. (MATH 2040 - Basic Statistics II) Statistical Methods II - Usually offered spring semester. Hypothesis testing of population means, proportions, etc. Contingency tables, goodness-of-fit, analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics. Introduction of computer packages to analyze data. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in STAT 2010 (or MATH 1020) or ECON 2070. (3)

2150L. (MATH 2150L) Statistics Technology Lab - Usually offered spring semester. Problem-solving in statistics using appropriate statistical software. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in STAT 2010 (MATH 1020) or ECON 2070. (1)

3010. (MATH 3010) Biostatistics - Applications of descriptive and inferential statistics to health science disciplines. Introduction of specialized techniques used in biomedical sciences. Prerequisites: Grade “C” or better in STAT 2020 or MATH 2040 or ECON 2070 or permission of the instructor. (3)

3051. (MATH 3051) Mathematical Probability and Statistics I - Usually offered fall semester. Introduction to concepts of probability and random variables. Discrete and continuous distribution with applications. Algebra of expectations. Covariance and correlation in two random variables. Corequisite: MATH 2080. (3)

3061. (MATH 3061) Mathematical Probability and Statistics II - Usually offered spring semester. Purpose and nature of sampling, particularly from normal populations. Chi-square, t, and F distributions. Formulating and testing statistical hypotheses, point and interval estimation. Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or higher in STAT 3051 (or MATH 3051) or permission of instructor. (3)

4201, 4202, 4203. Special Topics - Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (1, 2, 3)

4511-4521. (MATH 4511-4521) Colloquium - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Topic determined each semester by faculty. Independent work by students under the guidance of a faculty member to be presented orally and in writing to student majors and faculty. Meets once per week. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or higher in all MATH or STAT required courses at the 2000-level and junior or senior status. 4511 is prerequisite to 4521. (1-1)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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THEOLOGY (THEO)

A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL THEOLOGY COURSES IS THE SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ALL REQUIRED DEVELOPMENTAL READING AND ENGLISH COURSES.

Introductory Courses

NO STUDENT MAY TAKE MORE THAN ONE OF THESE COURSES TO SATISFY THE CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS. ALL COURSES ARE WRITING INTENSIVE

1100. The Christian Faith - Introduces the Christian Theological Tradition by presenting the historical, cultural and social contexts for past and contemporary Christian Faith. (3)

1120. Introduction to Biblical Studies - Introduces the discipline of biblical studies by applying various methodologies used by Bible scholars to the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. Examines the historical and cultural traditions that influenced the Bible, and the religious beliefs of ancient Israel. Requires careful reading of major portions of the Bible. (3)

1170. Introduction to Theology - Introduces theology by presenting the sources and methods for doing theology and using those preliminary guidelines to approach various types of Christian theology. (3

Upper-Level Courses

A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL UPPER-LEVEL COURSES IS THE SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF A 1000-LEVEL COURSE

2001. The Torah of Israel - Studies the core concepts of the Torah in light of modern biblical scholarship and looks at various traditional ways Jews, Christians, and Muslims have interpreted this block of biblical literature. (3

2002. Prophets and Prophecy - Examines the phenomenon of prophecy in the Ancient Near East, the historical, literary, and cultural situation of the various prophets and their major theological emphases. (3)

2003. Psalms and Wisdom Literature - Explores Hebrew poetic techniques, the various types of psalms and their setting in Israel’s life; examines the origins and function of Israel’s wisdom traditions. (3)

2021. The Synoptic Gospels and Acts - Studies the content of the synoptic Gospels of the New Testament and the Book of Acts as well as their literary, historical, social and theological contexts; compares and contrasts the various portraits of Jesus, their messages for the early Christians, and their relevance for modern readers. (3

2022. Pauline Correspondence - Examines the various letters in the Christian Scriptures associated with Paul; investigates the social settings and theological themes found in these letters and the contemporary disputes over the proper interpretation of this material. (3

2023. Apocalyptic Literature and the Book of Revelation - Investigates the historical and cultural situation of apocalyptic literature prior to and including the Book of Revelation; the major theological emphases found in Jewish and Christian apocalypses; critiques various ancient and modern interpretations of the Book of Revelation. (3)

2100. Comparative Religion - Examines the relationship of Christianity to one or more of the world’s religions. (3)

2110. Historical Survey of the Catholic Church - Presents the history of the Church, including the development of various forms and branches of Christianity. (3)

2120. Catholicism - Studies the theology, doctrine, ritual and moral principles specific to the Roman Catholic Church. (3)

2150. African American Christianity - Explores the meaning and theological implications of African American Christianity. (3)

2200. (HIST 2200) Religion and Southern Culture - Examines the historical interaction between religion and culture in the American South from the colonial period to the present, with particular emphasis upon the African American experience. (3)

2250. (HIST 2250) Religions of the Ancient Near East - Examines religion in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria, and Israel/Canaan through reading ancient Near Eastern religious texts, viewing religious iconography, and examining religious architecture and cultic implements. The course will explore these ancient societies’ answers to such questions as the nature of the divine, the relationship between the divine and humans (including all classes of society), creation, problems of theodicy, and their notions of afterlife. (3)

2410. Christianity in the Early Period - Explores the history of Christianity in the first five centuries. (3)

2420. Christianity in the Medieval Period - Explores the history of Christianity from Augustine to the Protestant Reformation. (3)

2440. Christianity in the Modern Period - Explores the history of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation to the present. (3)

2500. Moral Theology - Presents the Catholic tradition of morality with attention to selected moral issues in contemporary society. (3

2600. Women in Religion - Investigates womanist and feminist issues in religion and theology

2700. Religion and Theology in North America - Studies the development of religious and theological issues in North America. (3)

2800. Perspectives in Contemporary Theology - Examines contemporary national and international perspectives in theology, and the major theologians who represent them. (3)

3000. Sacramental Theology - Investigates the basic principles of sacramental theology in Catholicism and other Christian communities. (3)

3010S. Seminar - Seminar on specialized topics in the related fields of theology. (1)

3012S. Seminar: Research and Presentation Methods in Theology - A seminar con-ducted in conjunction with various full-time faculty members to gain practical experience in using the tools and methods appropriate to various Theological specializations. (1)

3020S. Seminar - Seminar to prepare for comprehensive exams. (1)

3030S. Seminar - Utilizes readings and lectures based on the research of individual faculty members. (3)

3060. Theological Understanding of Jesus Christ - Examines the historical and theological perspectives of Jesus Christ as presented in the Christian scriptures, in early centuries of Christian thought, and in subsequent Christian reflection. (3)

3080. Theological Understanding of the Catholic Church - Explores the essential nature of the Catholic Church from a theological perspective. (3)

3120. Methods of Biblical Study - Examines the field of biblical studies by concentrating on one or more methodologies, including archaeology, historical criticism, social-scientific methods, and/or literary-based analysis. (3)

3200. Theological Foundations of Social Justice - Investigates theological texts that give a basis for justice and its meaning for contemporary society. (3)

3300. Religion in Africa - Explores aspects of religious belief and practice in traditional African religion, Christianity, Islam and Independent African churches, as well as African Theologies of liberation and incarnation. (3)

3370. History of Jewish Thought - Presents an overview of Jewish historical religious tradition. (3)

3410. Theological Perspectives of the Reformation - Explores the historical, cultural and social contexts from which the various expressions of reform movements began. The course will examine the theologies of the Protestant Reformers, the radical Reformers, and the Roman Catholic Counter-Reformation. (3)

3800. Environmental Issues in Christian Perspective - Explores modern and contemporary environmental issues from a Christian theological perspective. (3)

3850. Theology and Science - Examines the relationship between theology and science by looking at the historical development of the relationship, how theology relates to the methods and theories of science, and how theology and science have influenced, and continue to influence, one another. (3)

4001, 4002, 4003. Directed Readings - Permission of chairperson. (1, 2, or 3)

4999. Senior Comprehensives - (0)

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WRITING (WRIT)

1050. Introduction to Creative Writing - This course introduces students to invention techniques, and components of fiction, poetry, and literary non-fiction. It will also teach workshop procedures. (3)

2050. Poetry Workshop - In this course, students learn to write different forms of poetry and will learn a variety of poetic elements such as image, metaphor, rhythm, rhyme and alliteration. Through readings, students will become familiar with the work of contemporary poets such as Lucille Clifton, Tess Gallagher, and C. K. Williams. Prerequisite: WRIT 1050. (3)

2060. Fiction Writing - Students explore different fiction writing elements such as character development, narrative point of view, setting, and plot. They begin to develop their skills at writing, revising and criticizing works of short fiction through their own creative endeavors and daily participation in the workshop. They will begin to develop, or add to their portfolio of works, while extending their familiarity with works of short fiction writers such as Raymond Carver and John Edgar Wideman, Alice Walker, and Eudora Welty. Prerequisite: WRIT 1050. (3)

2070. Nonfiction Writing - Students will study and practice writing different forms of literary nonfiction. The course will cover description, scene, summary, point of view, characterization, dialogue and other techniques. Through readings students also will become familiar with the work of contemporary essayists such as James Baldwin, Alice Walker, and Elie Weisel. Prerequisite: WRIT 1050. (3)

2080. Dramatic Writing - Dramatic Writing teaches the basics of play and screen writing including dramatic structure, character study, scene and sequence structure, techniques of visual narration, dialogue, adaptation, and language of film. Students will become familiar with contemporary playwrights, screen writers and directors. Prerequisite: WRIT 1050. (3)

2141, 2143. (ENGL 2141, ENGL 2143) Journal Practicum - Usually offered fall and spring semesters. Students gain hands-on experience in publishing. No prerequisite. Permission of the instructor required for 3 hours. Course may be repeated for credit. (1,3)

3060. Special Topics - Topics might include “Style and Technique in Third World Writing,” “Autobiography,”, “Style and Technique in African American Prose and Poetry,” “Poetry and Performance,” “Novel Writing,” “Science Fiction Writing,” “Poetry Translation,” “Literature and Film,” “Oral History,” “Reported Truth vs Literary Truth,” “Biography and Autobiography,” “Letters and Letter-Writing,” and “Nature Writing.” Prerequisite: 2000-level Writing course. (3)

4050. Seminar - Seminars will include intensive reading, creative writing and discussion. The course will also entail practice and studies of the form, craft and theory of various genres. Possible topics include, “Women’s Poetics – Ancient to Contemporary,” “Multicultural Poetics,” “Problems of Adaptation,” “Poetry, Personae, and Author,” “Literature and Translation,” and “Political Poetry.” Prerequisite: 2000-level Writing course. (3)

4060. Creative Thesis - Students will propose a special project which will accumulate into a body of creative work suitable for a portfolio for graduate school applications and in some instances for submission to a publisher. Projects might include writing a collection of poems, stories, or essays. Or a student might work on a novel, family history, play, or screenplay. The student may create a diverse body of work. Work will be evaluated by a committee of faculty members, including a chair responsible for directing the student’s writing endeavors. Prerequisite: 2000-level Writing course and approval of a thesis director and committee. (3)

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